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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

‘Earth & Sky’ Archives

Sky Tonight—February 1, For those at southerly

Sky Tonight—February 1, For those at southerly latitudes, Canopus!

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Here is a star that northern stargazers rarely see. It is Canopus, and it is the second-brightest star in the entire sky. You will not see this star from the northern U.S. or similar latitudes. However, northern skywatchers who travel south in winter – or people in latitudes like those in the southern U.S. – enjoy watching this star. You can always find Canopus by first locating Sirius, the sky’s ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 31, Star-hop from Great Square

Sky Tonight—January 31, Star-hop from Great Square of Pegasus to Andromeda galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight, try star-hopping to the famous Andromeda galaxy – the large spiral galaxy next-door to our Milky Way – from the Great Square of Pegasus. The planet Jupiter will be your guide. Ready? First, look westward for the four stars of the Great Square. You will find them to the right or upper right of the blazing planet Jupiter – in the west at nightfall and early evening. Keep in mind that our ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 30, Jupiter and Great Square of

Sky Tonight—January 30, Jupiter and Great Square of Pegasus in west after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org On these winter evenings, the dazzling planet Jupiter and the Great Square of Pegasus light up the western sky at nightfall. Be sure to catch them at early evening, because Jupiter and the Great Square start plunging beneath the horizon by around 9 to 10 o’clock this evening. You simply can’t miss Jupiter. It is the fourth brightest body in all the heavens, after the sun, moon and the planet Venus. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 29, Moon and Venus still close

Sky Tonight—January 29, Moon and Venus still close before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Wake up before sunrise tomorrow (Sunday, January 30) to see the moon and the planet Venus – the two brightest orbs of nighttime – lighting up the dawn and predawn sky. Our sky chart shows the sky scene as viewed from North America. Elsewhere around the world at this hour, expect the waning crescent moon and Venus to be positioned a little differently in your sky. Still, it hardly matters. In the wee ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 28, Moon and Venus in dawn and

Sky Tonight—January 28, Moon and Venus in dawn and predawn sky tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Given clear skies, you cannot miss seeing the waning crescent moon with the blazing planet Venus before sunrise tomorrow (Saturday, January 29). The moon and Venus rank as the second and third brightest celestial bodies in all the heavens. The sun, of course, ranks as the brightest celestial body of them all. Look into the east or southeast sky at or before dawn to enjoy the beautiful morning tableau. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 27, Saturn starts retrograde on

Sky Tonight—January 27, Saturn starts retrograde on January 27

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Starting today – on January 27, 2011 – Saturn will begin to go in a retrograde or westward direction in front of the constellation Virgo. That is a signal that the best time to see Saturn in 2011 has begun. Give me 5 minutes, and I’ll give you Saturn in 2011 The planet Saturn – a golden world that appears to shine steadily on the sky’s dome – is rising in the east around 11 p.m. now. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 26, Star Achernar marks the end

Sky Tonight—January 26, Star Achernar marks the end of the River

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Today’s chart is almost just like the January 23 chart, but today we have changed our observing location. Normally, our charts are set for the geographical center of the continental U.S. – say, somewhere in Kansas. Today’s chart is set to the extreme southern U.S. It is as if we are gazing at stars from the southernmost part of the country . . . maybe along the Texas/Mexico border, or from the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 25, Last quarter moon, Saturn,

Sky Tonight—January 25, Last quarter moon, Saturn, Spica before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The last quarter moon and the planet Saturn will shine on opposite sides of the bright star Spica before sunrise tomorrow (January 26). As seen from the northern hemisphere, the trio will appear southward before dawn. If you are more of a night owl than an early bird, and live at mid-northern latitudes, you can catch all three – the moon, Spica, and Saturn – in your southeastern sky around 1 a.m. to 2 ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 24, Moon, Saturn, Spica from

Sky Tonight—January 24, Moon, Saturn, Spica from midnight until dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you are willing to stay up late or to get up early, you can use the waning gibbous moon to find the planet Saturn and the constellation Virgo’s brightest star Spica. As seen from mid-northern latitudes, comparable to those in the United States, you might see all three luminaries – the moon, Saturn, Spica – low in your eastern sky by around midnight tonight. Farther north, the shining threesome ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 23, Eridanus-a winding river of

Sky Tonight—January 23, Eridanus-a winding river of stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright star in southwest on January evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter Here is a constellation for you if you have access to a very dark sky: Eridanus the River. You will not see this one from the city, or even the suburbs. Eridanus the River begins near the star Rigel in the constellation Orion the Hunter – and wells up in a great loop before ambling back down toward the southern horizon. Rigel: ... Full Story

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