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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Monday, November 24, 2014

‘Earth & Sky’ Archives

Sky Tonight—May 5, Eta Aquarid meteor shower best

Sky Tonight—May 5, Eta Aquarid meteor shower best before dawn on May 6

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Photo courtesy of tonynetone’s photostream The annual Eta Aquarid meteor shower is expected to produce the most meteors before dawn tomorrow (Friday, May 6). But – because these meteors have a relatively broad maximum – you can look for some Eta Aquarids before dawn on Saturday, too. Planets visible at dawn: Venus and possibly Mercury and Jupiter The Eta Aquarid meteors are strictly for night ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—May 4, Find Eta Aquarid meteor shower

Sky Tonight—May 4, Find Eta Aquarid meteor shower radiant before dawn May 5 and 6

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The Eta Aquarid meteor shower is now taking stage in the wee hours before dawn. It has expected to peak in the predawn sky on Friday morning – May 6, 2011 – in the dark hour before astronomical twilight. Don’t know when astronomical twilight begins in your sky? Find out with this handy custom sunrise sunset calendar. Under ideal conditions, this shower may produce up to 20 to 40 meteors per hour. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—May 3, Drive a spike to the star Spica

Sky Tonight—May 3, Drive a spike to the star Spica in May

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Yesterday we talked about learning to ‘follow the arc’ to the star Arcturus in the constellation Bootes. You just follow the curve in the Big Dipper’s handle until you see this orange star. Tonight, let the Big Dipper introduce you to another bright star. This star is Spica in the constellation Virgo the Maiden. You can ‘follow the arc’ to Arcturus AND ‘drive a spike’ or ‘speed on’ to ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—May 2, Follow the arc to the star

Sky Tonight—May 2, Follow the arc to the star Arcturus in May

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org It is now the perfect time to look outside in the evening and learn a phrase useful to sky watchers. The phrase is: ‘follow the arc to Arcturus.’ First, locate the Big Dipper asterism in the northeastern sky. Then draw an imaginary line following the curve in the Dipper’s handle until you come to a bright orange star. This star is Arcturus in the constellation Bootes, known in skylore as the ‘bear ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—May 1, Star hopping from constellation

Sky Tonight—May 1, Star hopping from constellation Orion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Rebecca wrote, “What is ‘star hopping?’ What does that mean?” Rebecca, amateur astronomers use star hopping to go from stars and constellations they know … to ones they do not know yet. First, look for noticeable patterns on the sky’s dome. One very easy pattern to find at this time of year is the constellation Orion the Hunter. You will find it descending in the west after sunset. Orion is ... Full Story

April 30, Watch for Venus and moon east before sunrise

April 30, Watch for Venus and moon east before sunrise May 1

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Given an unobstructed eastern horizon and clear skies, many people around the world should be able to see the waning crescent moon with the planet Venus at morning dawn tomorrow (Sunday, May 1). At mid-northern latitudes – like those in the continental US – the moon and Venus sit close to the eastern horizon around 60 to 45 minutes before sunup. Understanding waning crescent moon The farther north ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 29, Five planets before sunrise

Sky Tonight—April 29, Five planets before sunrise April 30. .

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Only Venus easily visible We show the moon and planets for about 30 minutes before sunrise tomorrow (Saturday, April 30) as seen from North American mid-northern latitudes. At mid-northern latitudes all around the world, the only two worlds that you are likely to see before sunrise tomorrow are the moon and blazing planet Venus. Look for them low in the east some 60 to 30 minutes before sunup. Binoculars ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 28, Spica is your guide star to

Sky Tonight—April 28, Spica is your guide star to Omega Centauri cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Silvery-blue Spica, the only prominent star in the constellation Virgo, acts as your guide to the Omega Centauri globular star cluster. To the unaided eye, Omega Centauri looks like a faint (and possibly fuzzy) star. Very few of the Milky Way galaxy’s 250 or so globular clusters are readily visible without optics. To find Spica, extend the curve of the Big Dipper handle, as illustrated on our April 5 ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 27, Leo loses his tail. We gain a

Sky Tonight—April 27, Leo loses his tail. We gain a constellation.

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart again shows the evening sky high to the south. To the upper left of the constellation Leo the Lion are dozens of very faint stars. They make up the constellation Coma Berenices, otherwise known as Berenice’s Hair. The Greek-Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy and others considered it the tuft at the end of Leo the Lion’s tail. Coma Berenices remained part of Leo until a few hundred years ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our diagram shows the constellation Leo the Lion for about 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. tonight. At this time, the Lion will be due south and at his highest point in the sky. Two distinctive star patterns make the Lion easy to identify. Leo’s brightest star – the sparkling blue-white gem Regulus – dots a backward question mark of stars known as The Sickle. If you see a Lion in this pattern of stars, the Sickle ... Full Story

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