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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Sunday, April 20, 2014

‘Earth & Sky’ Archives

EarthSky Tonight—September 10, Moon waxes as Venus

EarthSky Tonight—September 10,  Moon waxes as Venus wanes in September evening sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing crescent moon and the blazing planet Venus shine low in the west at dusk. Our chart shows the sky scene for about 45 minutes after sundown, with the moon barely above the horizon. If you miss the moon with Venus this evening, try again tomorrow. On Saturday, the lunar crescent will appear higher in the sky and will set later after sunset. Whenever the moon appears in the west at dusk and early evening, it is ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 9, Cassiopeia the Queen

EarthSky Tonight—September 9,  Cassiopeia the Queen in northeast

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Cassiopeia the Queen can be found in the northeast after sunset on September evenings. This constellation has the distinct shape of a W, or M, depending on the time of night you see it. The shape of this constellation makes Cassiopeia’s stars very noticeable. Cassiopeia represents an ancient Queen of Ethiopia. The entire constellation is also sometimes called Cassiopeia’s Chair, and some old star maps depict the ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 8, High tide alert!

EarthSky Tonight—September 8, High tide alert! Closest new moon of 2010

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Today – September 8 – features the closest new moon of 2010. Look for higher-than-usual tides along coastlines throughout the world. Because it crosses the sky with the sun during the day, you cannot see today’s extra-close new moon. Yet, it will usher in large tides along the ocean coastlines for the next several days, especially if these high tides are accompanied by strong onshore winds. 
Why is this moon so ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 7, Use Big Dipper to

EarthSky Tonight—September 7,  Use Big Dipper to find Polaris, the North Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart shows the Polaris, the Big and Little Dippers for a September evening. Notice that a line from the two outermost stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper point to Polaris, the North Star. Also notice that Polaris marks the tip of the handle of the Little Dipper. Bright star in east? Might be planet Jupiter, nearly at its closest since 1951. The Big Dipper swings full circle (360 degrees) around Polaris in ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 6, Star-hop to Sirius

EarthSky Tonight—September 6, Star-hop to Sirius from Orion’s Belt

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Sure, we have said it before, but we will say it again, because it is one of the neatest tricks in all the heavens. That is … Orion’s Belt points to Sirius. Sirius is the brightest star in the sky. It is up before dawn now, but will be shifting into the evening sky as the months pass. You can find Orion. Trust me. If you go outside and look southward before dawn now, you will notice Orion’s Belt, which consists of a ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 5, Hazy pyramid of light

EarthSky Tonight—September 5, Hazy pyramid of light in east? False dawn.

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Late summer and early autumn present the best time of year to see the false dawn, also known as the zodiacal light. With the moon out of the morning sky for the next two weeks, this is your chance to catch the zodiacal light before dawn. This light can be noticeable and easy to see from latitudes like those in the southern U.S. I’ve seen it many times from the latitude of southern Texas, sometimes while driving a lonely ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight September 4, Orion the

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight  September 4,  Orion the Hunter well up before dawn in September

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Mike wrote, “I noticed on your site that Orion returned to the predawn sky in late July. You called it the ghost of the summer dawn. Due to cloudy skies and other conditions, I was not able to see it until August 6. When will Orion return to the evening sky?” Mike, Orion the Hunter is always behind the sun as seen from Earth in June. It comes back to the predawn sky every year in late July. By early September, Orion is ... Full Story

September 3, Find the Lagoon and Trifid Nebulae

September 3,  Find the Lagoon and Trifid Nebulae

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Take a dip in the Lagoon and Trifid nebulae on these September evenings. Before you head out the door after dark, be sure to grab your binoculars. Look in the south to southwest at nightfall and early evening to see the beautiful constellation Sagittarius just above the horizon. The famed Teapot asterism, part of Sagittarius, appears to be pouring tea from its spout towards the horizon. These nebulae are in this part of the ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight September 2, Venus sets

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight   September 2,  Venus sets as Jupiter rises on September evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org All this month – during September 2010 – the queen planet Venus sets in the west as the king planet Jupiter rises in the east. Our chart shows the eastern sky at early evening for mid-northern latitudes, with Jupiter – the sky’s second brightest planet – shining to the lower right of the Great Square of Pegasus. Venus – the sky’s brightest planet – pops out in the west shortly after sunset. As dusk deepens, ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 1, Venus, Mars, Spica

EarthSky Tonight—September 1,  Venus, Mars, Spica meet in west after sunset early September

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The first few evenings of September 2010 present a celestial trio – the planets Venus and Mars, and the star Spica fitting within a circle that is smaller than 5 degrees in diameter. Because a typical binocular field spans about 5 degrees of sky, there is a good chance of seeing all three luminaries squeezing up together inside a single binocular field. All three should be bright enough to see with the unaided eye, if ... Full Story

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