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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

‘Earth & Sky’ Archives

Earthsky Tonight—July 1: Big Dipper points to

Earthsky Tonight—July 1: Big Dipper points to Polaris, helps find Thuban

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Today our star-hopping adventure begins at the Big Dipper in the constellation Ursa Major. Draw a line through the Big Dipper’s pointer stars – Duhbe and Merak – to locate Polaris the North Star. Polaris isn’t the brightest star in the sky, as is commonly supposed. It is only the 50th brightest or so. Still, Polaris is bright enough to be seen with relative ease on a dark, clear night. This star is famous not for ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 30:When is the next meteor

Earthsky Tonight—June 30:When is the next meteor shower?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We get lots of questions about meteor showers. Kathlen in the Bronx wrote, “When is the next meteor shower going to happen?” Gayatri in Oceanside, California wrote, “I have never seen a shooting star. I want to see one. Is there any event happening? How should I find one?” Kathlen, Gayatri, and everyone else who longs to see a “shooting star” or meteor streaking across a clear night sky . . . it is possible to ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 29: Find the Libra stars

Earthsky Tonight—June 29: Find the Libra stars between Antares and Spica

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Before moonlight floods the nighttime at late night tonight, see if you can spot the constellation Libra’s two visible yet modestly bright stars: Zubenelgenubi and Zubeneschamali. If you live at mid-northern latitudes – like in North America, Europe and Asia – you will see these Libra stars rather low in your southern sky at nightfall and early evening. As seen from middle latitudes in the southern hemisphere – like ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 28:Look for daytime moon each

Earthsky Tonight—June 28:Look for daytime moon each morning this week

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Full moon was two days ago. That means the moon is now in a waning gibbous phase, rising late at night and setting in a westward direction after sunrise. That means you can look in the southwest sky after sunrise tomorrow to see the moon in a clear blue daytime sky. Each day this week you can see the daytime moon in the morning sky. If you look for the moon at the same time every morning, you will see that the moon climbs ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 27: Latest sunsets of the year

Earthsky Tonight—June 27: Latest sunsets of the year plus three evening planets

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org For people living around 40 degrees north latitude, the latest sunsets of the year happen around now. However, in the southern hemisphere, at 40 degrees south latitude, it is the year’s latest sunrises that are happening around now. That is in spite of the fact that the longest (or shortest) day was about a week ago, on the June 21 solstice. To celebrate the late June sunsets, today’s sky chart shows the bright stars ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 27: Latest sunsets of the year

EarthSky Tonight-June 27: Latest sunsets of the year in late June

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org For people living around 40 degrees north latitude, the latest sunset of the year happens around now. In the southern hemisphere, at 40 degrees south latitude, it is the year’s latest sunrise that is happening around now. That is in spite of the fact that the longest or shortest day of the year (in terms of daylight) took place about a week ago, on the June 21 solstice. To celebrate these late June sunsets, our sky ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 26: See Earth’s orbital plane

EarthSky Tonight-June 26: See Earth’s orbital plane with the mind’s eye

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org It is early evening, and our chart covers a much larger section of sky than we usually display. We are showing the sky’s southeast quadrant – from east-southeast (where the moon lies) to south-southwest (where the star Spica resides). As seen from mid-northern latitudes, this evening’s line-up of lights – the moon, the stars Antares, Zubenelgenubi and Spica – arcs rather low across the southern sky. The farther ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 25: Partial eclipse of moon

EarthSky Tonight-June 25: Partial eclipse of moon before dawn June 26 for Americas

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org There is a partial eclipse of the moon visible before dawn on Saturday, June 26, visible to those living in the western half of the United States, Canada or South America. The best view in the U.S. will be from the Pacific states, just before sunrise Saturday. Everyone in Mexico and Central America can also see the partial eclipse – everyone willing to wake up before dawn on Saturday morning. Some will see it and think ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 24: Earth passes between sun and

EarthSky Tonight-June 24: Earth passes between sun and Pluto tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Pluto – the former planet – comes to opposition on June 25, at 19:00 Universal Time. That is when we on Earth pass more or less between the sun and Pluto, so that this distant world is now opposite the sun in our sky. Of course, in Pluto’s case, it is not exactly opposite since the orbit of Pluto is inclined to the plane of the solar system by 17 degrees. That is a greater inclination than the orbits of Mercury, ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 23: Waxing gibbous moon passes

EarthSky Tonight-June 23: Waxing gibbous moon passes near Scorpion’s Heart

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight the moon returns to the constellation Scorpius the Scorpion. The brightest star in the immediate vicinity is Antares, whose name means “like Mars,” because of its similar reddish hue. If you remember your Greek mythology, or perhaps episodes of Xena: Warrior Princess, Ares is the god of war, the counterpart to the Roman god Mars. You can perform the color comparison yourself, because the planet Mars lies in the ... Full Story

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