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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, July 2, 2016

‘History’ Archives

On This Day, November 10, 1775

On This Day, November 10, 1775

  Birth of the U.S. Marine Corps During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that "two Battalions of Marines be raised" for service as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopted in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines ... Full Story

On This Day, November 9, 1938

On This Day, November 9, 1938

"The Night of Broken Glass" This day in 1938 saw the organized destruction of Jewish businesses and homes in Munich, as well as the beating and murder of Jewish men, women, and children. It was an exercise in terror that would be called "Kristallnacht," or "the Night of Broken Glass," because of the cost of broken glass in looted Jewish shops—$5 million marks ($1,250,000). On November 7, in Paris, a 17-year-old German Jewish refugee, Herschel Grynszpan, shot and killed the third secretary of ... Full Story

On This Day, November 8, 1895

On This Day, November 8, 1895

German scientist discovers X-rays   On this day in 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845-1923) becomes the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible. Rontgen's discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated ... Full Story

On This Day, November 7 1940

On This Day, November 7 1940

Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses  The Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses due to high winds on this day in 1940.The only fatality was a dog left in a car stranded on the bridge.. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge was built in Washington during the 1930s and opened to traffic on July 1, 1940. It spanned the Puget Sound from Gig Harbor to Tacoma, which is 40 miles south of Seattle. The channel is about a mile wide where the bridge crossed the sound. Sleek and slender, it was the third longest suspension ... Full Story

On This Day, November 6, 1982

  A woman ices her husband with anti-freeze Shirley Allen is arrested for poisoning her husband, Lloyd Allen, with ethylene glycol, commonly known as anti-freeze. After witnessing her mother spike Lloyd's drinks with the deadly substance, Shirley's own daughter turned her in to the authorities. Lloyd Allen was Shirley's sixth husband and the second to die from mysterious causes; the other four had divorced her. John Gregg, who died a year after he married Shirley in 1977, had changed the ... Full Story

On This Day, November 5, 1895

On This Day, November 5, 1895

On November 5, 1895, Rochester attorney George Selden wins U.S. Patent No. 549,160 for an "improved road engine" powered by a "liquid-hydrocarbon engine of the compression type." With that, as far as the government was concerned, George Selden had invented the car--though he had never built a single one. Selden's design was fairly vague, and was actually based on a two-cylinder internal-combustion engine that someone else had invented: Selden had simply copied the one he'd seen on display at ... Full Story

On This Day, November 4, 1922

On This Day, November 4, 1922

Entrance to King Tut's tomb discovered British archaeologist Howard Carter and his workmen discover a step leading to the tomb of King Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. When Carter first arrived in Egypt in 1891, most of the ancient Egyptian tombs had been discovered, though the little-known King Tutankhamen, who had died when he was 18, was still unaccounted for. After World War I, Carter began an intensive search for "King Tut's Tomb," finally finding steps to the burial room ... Full Story

On This Day, November 3, 1948

On This Day, November 3, 1948

  Newspaper mistakenly declares Dewey president   On this day in 1948, the Chicago Tribune jumps the gun and mistakenly declares New York Governor Thomas Dewey the winner of his presidential race with incumbent Harry S. Truman in a front-page headline: "Dewey Defeats Truman." Many of America's major newspapers had predicted a Dewey victory early on in the campaign. A New York Times article editorialized that "if Truman is nominated, he will be forced to wage the loneliest campaign in ... Full Story

On This Day, November 2, 1947

On This Day, November 2, 1947

Spruce Goose flies   The Hughes Flying Boat—the largest aircraft ever built—is piloted by designer Howard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the massive wooden aircraft had a wingspan longer than a football field and was designed to carry more than 700 men to battle. Howard Hughes was a successful Hollywood movie producer when he founded the Hughes Aircraft Company in 1932. He personally tested cutting-edge aircraft of his own design and in ... Full Story

On This Day, November 1, 1512

On This Day, November 1, 1512

Sistine Chapel ceiling opens to public The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, one of Italian artist Michelangelo's finest works, is exhibited to the public for the first time. Michelangelo Buonarroti, the greatest of the Italian Renaissance artists, was born in the small village of Caprese in 1475. The son of a government administrator, he grew up in Florence, a center of the early Renaissance movement, and became an artist's apprentice at age 13. Demonstrating obvious talent, he was ... Full Story

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