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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Aldebaran’

Sky Tonight—April 13, Moon close to Regulus – a

Sky Tonight—April 13, Moon close to Regulus – a Royal Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight, the waxing gibbous moon shines close to Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Regulus is considered to be the Heart of the Lion in Leo. Regulus is also one of the four “Royal Stars” of ancient Persia. These Royal Stars mark the four quadrants of the heavens. They are Regulus, Antares, Fomalhaut, and Aldebaran. Regulus: Heart of the Lion Four to five thousand years ago, the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 7, Waxing crescent moon in front

Sky Tonight—April 7, Waxing crescent moon in front of Taurus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Look in the west tonight after dark to see the waxing crescent moon in front of the constellation Taurus the Bull. Tonight’s moon presents a great jumping-off spot to find your way around Taurus. The star glaring to the left or upper left of the moon is Aldebaran, Taurus’s brightest star. Aldebaran, the ruddy eye of the Bull, is a red giant star and in the autumn of its years. The other bright light above the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 13, Moon shines in front of Winter

Sky Tonight—March 13, Moon shines in front of Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org As seen tonight from all over the world, the moon passes right in front of the great big loop of stars known to northern hemisphere residents as the Winter Circle or the Winter Hexagon. This huge star formation makes even the constellation Orion the Hunter look small. Orion sits in the southwest (lower right) corner of the Winter Circle. The Winter Circle is an asterism – a group of stars that is NOT a ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 12, Moon between Capella and

Sky Tonight—March 12, Moon between Capella and Betelgeuse

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The first quarter moon will be shining between two brilliant stars tonight. Capella, the brightest star in the constellation Auriga, will be beaming north of the moon, while Betelgeuse, the star marking the right shoulder in the constellation Orion, will be shining south of the moon. From mid-northern latitudes in Europe and Asia, you will see the moon farther west (right), and closer to the star Aldebaran, than ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 10, Moon shines close to Pleiades

Sky Tonight—March 10, Moon shines close to Pleiades star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The waxing crescent moon shines in the vicinity of the Pleiades star cluster tonight. On the other hand, if you live in the eastern part of the globe –Asia, Indonesia, Australia, or New Zealand – you will see the moon closer to the Pleiades tomorrow night. On a dark night, most people see the Pleiades cluster as a tiny dipper-shaped formation made of six little starlets. That lost seventh star – the missing ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 13, Moon points the way to

Sky Tonight—February 13, Moon points the way to Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s waxing gibbous moon resides inside the Winter Circle – an incredibly large star configuration made of six brilliant winter stars. Be sure to notice the variety in the colors of these stars. The Winter Circle – sometimes called the Winter Hexagon – is not one of the 88 recognized constellations. Rather, it is an asterism – a pattern of stars that is easy to recognize. Our sky chart cannot ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 12, Moon between stars Elnath

Sky Tonight—February 12, Moon between stars Elnath and Aldebaran

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org As seen from around the world, the waxing gibbous moon shines in front of the constellation Taurus the Bull tonight. Despite the moonlit glare, you may see the Bull’s two brightest stars: Aldebaran and Elnath. Aldebaran, the star depicting the Bull’s eye, is Taurus’ brightest star. Elnath, the constellation’s second brightest star, marks the tip of the Bull’s northern horn. Aldebaran: Fiery eye of the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 11, Waxing gibbous moon near

Sky Tonight—February 11, Waxing gibbous moon near Pleiades

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon shines close to the Pleiades star cluster tonight. This cluster is also called the Seven Sisters. Because of the moonlit glare, you might need binoculars to see the dipper-shaped Pleiades cluster. As seen from North America, the Pleiades sit to the west (right) of tonight’s moon. As seen from mid-northern latitudes in Europe and Asia, the Pleiades sit to the moon’s east (or left). ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 21, Identify the Winter Circle

Sky Tonight—January 21, Identify the Winter Circle and winter’s brightest stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart covers a wider area of sky than what we typically show. It is in answer to a reader in Nashville, who wrote, I have heard mention of the Winter Circle of Stars. Could you list the stars in this circle? You will find these stars at this time of year by looking east-southeast at early to mid evening. Again, this is a large pattern and covers a wide area of sky, but as always, it is easiest to start ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 15, Moon near Aldebaran and the

Sky Tonight—January 15, Moon near Aldebaran and the Pleiades

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright star on January evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter We are displaying a larger swath of sky than we usually do on tonight’s chart. That is because we are showing you how to star-hop from the three stars of Orion’s Belt to the star Aldebaran and the Pleiades star cluster. Aldebaran and the Pleiades cluster reside within the constellation Taurus the Bull. However, you will not need Orion’s Belt to ... Full Story

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