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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Big Dipper’

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Oct. 27, Where is the Big

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Oct. 27,  Where is the Big Dipper on these autumn evenings?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Where is the Big Dipper at nightfall and early evening? At this time of year, the most famous star pattern visible from this hemisphere – the Big Dipper – lurks low in the north during the evening hours. It is tough to spot the Dipper in the evening at this time of year, especially in the southern states, although you will see it before dawn around now, ascending in the northeast. Bright object in southeast on October ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—October 16, See Cassiopeia and Big

EarthSky Tonight—October 16, See Cassiopeia and Big Dipper on autumn evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org On October evenings, the Big Dipper resides rather low in the northwest sky, and the W or M-shape constellation Cassiopeia the Queen sits on her throne in the upper northeast sky. These two star formations are like riders on opposite side of a Ferris Wheel. They spin around Polaris, the North Star, once a day. As one rises upward, the other plunges downward – and vice versa. As evening deepens into late night, the Big ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 7, Use Big Dipper to

EarthSky Tonight—September 7,  Use Big Dipper to find Polaris, the North Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart shows the Polaris, the Big and Little Dippers for a September evening. Notice that a line from the two outermost stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper point to Polaris, the North Star. Also notice that Polaris marks the tip of the handle of the Little Dipper. Bright star in east? Might be planet Jupiter, nearly at its closest since 1951. The Big Dipper swings full circle (360 degrees) around Polaris in ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 20, Star-hop from Big Dipper

EarthSky Tonight—August 20, Star-hop from Big Dipper to Arcturus and Spica

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The Big Dipper pops out into your northwestern sky on August evenings. On August 3, we star-hopped from the Big Dipper to Polaris, the North Star. Tonight, we star-hop to two bright summer stars: Arcturus and Spica. As shown on our sky chart, we extend the Big Dipper handle “to arc to Arcturus and to drive a spike to Spica.” Arcturus is the brightest star in your western sky, so you cannot miss this yellow-orange ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 1: Big Dipper points to

Earthsky Tonight—July 1: Big Dipper points to Polaris, helps find Thuban

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Today our star-hopping adventure begins at the Big Dipper in the constellation Ursa Major. Draw a line through the Big Dipper’s pointer stars – Duhbe and Merak – to locate Polaris the North Star. Polaris isn’t the brightest star in the sky, as is commonly supposed. It is only the 50th brightest or so. Still, Polaris is bright enough to be seen with relative ease on a dark, clear night. This star is famous not for ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 1: Big Dipper high in north on

Earthsky Tonight—June 1: Big Dipper high in north on June evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is the legendary Big Dipper, now high in the north during the evening hours. It is one of the most familiar star patterns in the sky because its shape really resembles a dipper. Less familiar – and tougher to find – is the Little Dipper. Here is how you can find it. First, locate the Big Dipper in the northern sky during the evening hours. Notice that the Big Dipper has two parts: a bowl and a handle. See the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — May 2, Drive a spike to the star

Earthsky Tonight — May 2, Drive a spike to the star Spica in May

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Yesterday we talked about learning to ‘follow the arc’ to the star Arcturus in the constellation Bootes. You just follow the curve in the Big Dipper’s handle until you see this orange star. Tonight, let the Big Dipper introduce you to another bright star. This star is Spica in the constellation Virgo the Maiden. You can ‘follow the arc’ to Arcturus AND ‘drive a spike’ or ’speed on’ to ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — May 1, Follow the arc to the star

Earthsky Tonight — May 1, Follow the arc to the star Arcturus in May

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org It is now the perfect time to look outside in the evening and learn a phrase useful to sky watchers. The phrase is: ‘follow the arc to Arcturus.’ First, locate the Big Dipper asterism in the northeastern sky. Then draw an imaginary line following the curve in the Dipper’s handle until you come to a bright orange star. This star is Arcturus in the constellation Bootes, known in sky lore as the ‘bear ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 26, Moon, Spica and Saturn

Earthsky Tonight — April 26, Moon, Spica and Saturn in Virgo

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight, the almost-full waxing gibbous moon sits close to Spica, the brightest star in the constellation Virgo the Maiden. The star-like point of light above the moon this Monday evening is actually no star at all but Saturn, the 6th planet outward from the sun. Although the moon pairs up with Spica for only a day or two each month, you can always use the Big Dipper to star-hop to Spica after the moon goes down the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 9: Star-hop to Canes

Earthsky Tonight — April 9: Star-hop to Canes Venatici, the Hunting Dogs

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We show a larger section of sky than we normally do on this chart. We’re looking directly overhead at about 10:00 p.m., viewing the sky from the comfort of a reclining lawn chair, with our feet pointing southward. The constellation Leo the Lion stands high in the southern sky, while the upside-down Big Dipper is high in the north. Tonight, we star-hop to the constellation Canes Venatici the Hunting Dogs by using the Big ... Full Story

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