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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Bruce McClure’

Earthsky Tonight—March 11: Mars stationary in front

Earthsky Tonight—March 11: Mars stationary in front of stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Almanacs say the planet Mars is “stationary” today. However, stationary doesn’t mean that Mars stays in the same place in Earth’s sky all night tonight. Mars actually shines in the southern sky at mid-evening, and crosses the sky westward throughout the night. This ruddy world sets beneath the western horizon before dawn tomorrow. Does stationary mean that Mars is staying still in its orbit around the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—March 10: Is Sirius the most

Earthsky Tonight—March 10: Is Sirius the most luminous star in the sky?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Look south at nightfall and early evening, and you can’t miss Sirius, the brightest star in the nighttime sky. Mia asks, “Isn’t there a brighter star in absolute magnitude which appears dimmer because of its distance?” Yes, Mia, you are right. Sirius looks extraordinarily bright in Earth’s sky because it is only 8.6 light-years away. Many stars on the sky’s dome are intrinsically more luminous ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 8, 2010: The Summer

Earthsky Tonight — March 8, 2010: The Summer Triangle, a signpost for all seasons

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org As seen from our northern temperate latitudes, the three brilliant stars of the Summer Triangle – Vega, Deneb and Altair – are out for at least part of the night every night of the year. Presently, the Summer Triangle shines in the eastern sky at and before dawn. Like the Big Dipper, the Summer Triangle is an asterism – a pattern of stars that is not one of the officially recognized 88 constellations. To gauge the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 5, 2010: Star Arcturus is a

Earthsky Tonight — March 5, 2010: Star Arcturus is a harbinger of spring

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The gloriously bright star Arcturus rises into your east northeastern sky around 9 p.m. tonight. This yellow-orange beauty – like any brilliant star – sparkles wildly when it hovers near the horizon. Arcturus is the brightest star in the constellation Bootes, which represents a Herdsman – though to our modern eyes, this star formation might look more like a kite or snow cone. Arcturus is the fourth brightest star ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 2, 2010: Moon still near

Earthsky Tonight — March 2, 2010: Moon still near Saturn, closer to Spica on March 2

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Last night, the moon was close to the planet Saturn on the sky’s dome. Tonight, the moon will pair up with Spica, the constellation Virgo’s brightest star. Our chart shows the eastern sky for fairly late tonight, around 10:00 p.m. That is when the waning gibbous moon and the star Spica will be low in the sky, below the planet Saturn. The moon and Spica will travel westward across the sky throughout the night. ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Mar 1, 2010: Moon and Saturn

Earthsky Tonight – Mar 1, 2010: Moon and Saturn rise shortly after dark

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If the skies are clear, you cannot miss the planet Saturn this evening. The waning gibbous moon and Saturn rise above your eastern horizon by around 8:00 p.m. tonight. For the precise rising times for the moon and Saturn into your sky, check out the links on our almanac page. These rising times presume a level horizon. Saturn is that star-like object by tonight’s moon. Saturn is no star, however. Stars put ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 28, 2010: Full moon comes

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 28, 2010: Full moon comes February 28

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The February full moon falls at 16:38 Universal Time today. That is 10:38 a.m. in the central U.S. Every full moon takes place at the same instant for everyone all around the world – but your clock time for the full moon varies by your time zone. To look full to us, the moon has to be opposite the sun. That moment when it’s most opposite the sun for the month marks the instant of full moon – and that ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 25, 2010: Moon and Mars

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 25, 2010: Moon and Mars close together

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon and planet Mars can be seen in the eastern sky at nightfall tonight. These two worlds climb highest in the sky in mid to late evening and set in the west tomorrow before the onset of dawn. You can see the moon and Mars close together on our sky’s dome for most of the night tonight. The moon and Mars aren’t really close together in space. They only appear to be close, because they ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 24, 2010: Moon near Mars,

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 24, 2010: Moon near Mars, Castor, Pollux

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The big and bright waxing gibbous moon erases many stars from the blackboard of night tonight. Nonetheless, the two brightest stars in the constellation Gemini the Twins – Castor and Pollux – should be able to withstand the moonlit glare. The moon is near with Castor and Pollux this evening. However, you can’t count on the moon to guide you to Castor and Pollux every night. Tomorrow, at this same time, you ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 23, 2010: Moon highlights

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 23, 2010: Moon highlights Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org This evening, the waxing gibbous moon nearly aligns with the galactic anticenter – the direction opposite to the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. Tonight’s moon, moreover, resides inside the Winter Circle – an incredibly large star configuration made of six brilliant winter stars. The Winter Circle – sometimes called the Winter Hexagon – is not one of the 88 recognized constellations. Rather, ... Full Story

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