November 2014
S M T W T F S
« Oct    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Cancer the Crab’

Sky Tonight—April 12, Use moon to locate Cancer the

Sky Tonight—April 12, Use moon to locate Cancer the Crab

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The moon can guide you to Cancer the Crab tonight – if you are patient. You have probably heard of the constellation Cancer, but there is a good chance you have never seen it. As constellations go, Cancer the Crab is probably the most famous constellation that the fewest people can actually identify in the night sky. Its primary competitors in the famous-but-not-recognizable category are probably Aries the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 16, Bright moon puts Cancer in

Sky Tonight—February 16, Bright moon puts Cancer in spotlight

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The almost-full waxing gibbous moon puts the constellation Cancer in the spotlight – but out of view – this Wednesday night. Demure Cancer the Crab is the faintest constellation of the Zodiac. You can see it only on dark, moonless nights. Understanding moon phases The starry sky is like a great big connect-the-dots book, enabling stargazers to star-hop from brighter stars to more obscure nighttime ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive cluster pair up in mid April

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org These mid-April evenings provide you with a golden opportunity to see the Beehive star cluster, the crown jewel of the constellation Cancer the Crab. The moon will be absent from the sky for the next several evenings, featuring dark nights for observing this deep-sky treasure. The Beehive is faintly visible to the unaided eye in a dark country sky. However, you really need binoculars to transform this hazy smudge of light ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 25, 2010: Moon and Mars

Earthsky Tonight — March 25, 2010: Moon and Mars guide to Beehive star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you observed the moon last night, you know that the planet Mars appeared to the upper left of the moon. This evening, you will find Mars as a bright orangish “star” to the upper right of the moon. You will need a medium sized telescope and good seeing conditions to see much on Mars, but a small telescope or even a good pair of binoculars will show you many features on the moon. The large dark spots are lava ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 24, Moon close to Mars

Earthsky Tonight — March 24, Moon close to Mars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you have been tracking the moon over the past few evenings, you know that it has been passing through some of the major players in the late winter, early spring skies. It skimmed the Pleiades star cluster on Saturday, then it plodded through Taurus the Bull, across Gemini the Twins and after midnight tonight it slips into Cancer the Crab. However, unlike Taurus and Gemini, Cancer is a very faint ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 5, 2010 Bright Mars and

Earthsky Tonight, February 5, 2010 Bright Mars and Beehive star cluster in same binocular field

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you’ve never seen the planet Mars – or haven’t seen it recently – now is the time to look. This reddish world – the world most like Earth in our solar system – shines more brilliantly this February than it will for the next several years. What’s more, Mars sits right in front of the constellation Cancer the Crab now. It shines only 3 degrees from a beautiful star cluster in the direction of ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – January 30, 2010 Moon in Leo,

Earthsky Tonight – January 30, 2010 Moon in Leo, Mars in Cancer

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our chart shows the eastern sky for around 8 to 9 o’clock tonight. The planet Mars shines brightly above the full-looking waning gibbous moon. Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion, lurks to the lower left of the moon. Although Regulus rates as a first-magnitude star, it may be hard to spot in the lunar glare tonight. Try binoculars, if you can’t see Regulus with the eye alone. The ... Full Story

Page 1 of 11