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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Canis Major’

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

A broad expanse of glowing gas and dust presents a bird-like visage to astronomers from planet Earth, suggesting its popular moniker - The Seagull Nebula. This portrait of the cosmic bird covers a 1.6 degree wide swath across the plane of the Milky Way, near the direction of Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. Of course, the region includes objects with other catalog designations: notably NGC 2327, a compact, dusty emission region with an embedded massive star that forms the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 1, For those at southerly

Sky Tonight—February 1, For those at southerly latitudes, Canopus!

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Here is a star that northern stargazers rarely see. It is Canopus, and it is the second-brightest star in the entire sky. You will not see this star from the northern U.S. or similar latitudes. However, northern skywatchers who travel south in winter – or people in latitudes like those in the southern U.S. – enjoy watching this star. You can always find Canopus by first locating Sirius, the sky’s ... Full Story

Astronomy Photo of the Day

Astronomy Photo of the Day

The Seagull Nebula Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Sidonio Explanation: This broad expanse of glowing gas and dust presents a bird-like visage to astronomers from planet Earth, suggesting its popular moniker - The Seagull Nebula. This portrait of the cosmic bird covers a 1.6 degree wide swath across the plane of the Milky Way, near the direction of Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. Of course, the region includes objects with other catalog ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—December 31, See brightest star at

Sky Tonight—December 31, See brightest star at midnight

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Sirius in the constellation Canis Major – the legendary Dog Star – should be called the New Year’s star. This star – the brightest star in our sky – celebrates 2011 and every new year by reaching its highest point in the sky around the stroke of midnight. How can you find Sirius? It is easy because this star is the brightest one we see from Earth. Its name means ‘Sparkling’ or ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—October 15, See the sky’s

EarthSky Tonight—October 15,  See the sky’s brightest star, Sirius, before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Andy wrote, "Early this morning, looking southeast, I saw a beautiful star, bright and multicolored. . .Can you identify it for me?" Paula wrote, "This morning two of us got up early. We found a pulsing star straight down the sky below Orion’s Belt. It was pulsing the colors of green, yellow, blue and red like a strobe light. I will search for it every morning as it was so enchanting.” It is enchanting, so much so ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 30, Star hopping from

Earthsky Tonight — April 30, Star hopping from constellation Orion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Rebecca wrote, “What is ’star hopping?’ What does that mean?” Rebecca, amateur astronomers use star hopping to go from stars and constellations they know … to ones they don’t know yet. First, look for noticeable patterns on the sky’s dome. One very easy pattern to find at this time of year is the constellation Orion the Hunter. You will find it descending in the west after sunset. Orion is easy to find ... Full Story

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