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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Friday, July 11, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Cassiopeia’

EarthSky Tonight—October 16, See Cassiopeia and Big

EarthSky Tonight—October 16, See Cassiopeia and Big Dipper on autumn evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org On October evenings, the Big Dipper resides rather low in the northwest sky, and the W or M-shape constellation Cassiopeia the Queen sits on her throne in the upper northeast sky. These two star formations are like riders on opposite side of a Ferris Wheel. They spin around Polaris, the North Star, once a day. As one rises upward, the other plunges downward – and vice versa. As evening deepens into late night, the Big ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 17, Close-up on

EarthSky Tonight—September 17,  Close-up on constellation Perseus the Hero and Demon Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Will you be able to see the ‘demon’ star in the constellation Perseus the Hero tonight? Yesterday’s chart showed you how to use the constellation Cassiopeia to locate Perseus in the northeast at mid to late evening. The brightest star in Perseus is Alpha Persei, whose proper name is Mirfak, pronounced MEER-fak. Comet Hartley 2 passes in front of Cassiopeia, Perseus in autumn 2010 Meanwhile, the best-known star ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 16, Cassiopeia and Perseus in

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 16, Cassiopeia and Perseus in northeast on September evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At this time of year, if you are in the northern hemisphere, try looking northeast at mid to late evening for two prominent constellations, Cassiopeia and Perseus. Learn these constellations now, and you may be able catch Comet Hartley 2 in front of Cassiopeia in late September and the first week in October. Then watch as the comet passes through Perseus until October 17. Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – August 11, How to find the

Earthsky Tonight – August 11, How to find the radiant point for Perseid meteors

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is the radiant point for the famous Perseid meteor shower. The 2010 Perseid meteors are peaking over the next few days. As always, you will see the most meteors between midnight and dawn. The morning of August 12 should be good. The morning of August 13 might be best for watching meteors. You might see meteors on the morning of August 14 as well, although the Perseids do tend to fall off rapidly after their ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 4, Cassiopeia the Queen on

Earthsky Tonight—August 4, Cassiopeia the Queen on summer evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org One of the most recognizable constellations is Cassiopeia the Queen, which now can be found in the northeastern sky a couple of hours after the sun goes down. This constellation has the distinct shape of a W, or M, depending on your perspective. Cassiopeia is associated with a queen of Ethiopia. She is sometimes called the Lady of the Chair. Queen Cassiopeia was said to have offended the sea nymphs, or Nereids, by ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – February 14, 2010: The Double

Earthsky Tonight – February 14, 2010: The Double Cluster in Perseus

Face the northwestern horizon this evening – above and to the right of the place where the sun set on the western horizon – but mid- to late evening. Here you can find the Double Cluster in the constellation Perseus. These are two open stars clusters, known as “H” and “Chi” Persei (also called NGC 884 and 869). How to find them? First, you need a dark sky. As you work your way up from the northwest horizon you’ll see the famous constellation Cassiopeia forming a ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 13, 2010: Cassiopeia is

Earthsky Tonight, February 13, 2010: Cassiopeia is shaped like an ‘M’ or ‘W’

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Erick wrote, “Do you have any information on Cassiopeia’s Chair?” Erick, you have used the lovely old-fashioned name for this constellation. In the 1930s, the International Astronomical Union gave this constellation an official name of Cassiopeia the Queen, but skywatchers still see the chair, and speak of it. Cassiopeia was a queen in ancient Greek mythology. According to legend, she boasted she was ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight: January 12, 2010 – Cassiopeia

Earthsky Tonight: January 12, 2010 – Cassiopeia and Big Dipper are opposite each other

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The constellation Cassiopeia the Queen is easy to recognize in the northern sky, either in the evening or before dawn. This constellation is shaped like a W or M and contains five moderately bright stars. The distinctive shape of Cassiopeia makes her very noticeable among the stars of the northern sky. Cassiopeia is also famous in relationship to another constellation, Ursa Major, which contains the Big Dipper ... Full Story

EathSky Dec. 24, 2009 – Southern Cross visible

EathSky Dec. 24, 2009 – Southern Cross visible in Hawaii before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here’s a gift. A reader asked us, When can I see the Southern Cross in Hawaii? At this time of year, Hawaiians can see the Southern Cross, which is also known as the constellation Crux, in the wee hours before dawn. The Southern Cross stands pretty much upright, but quite low in the southern sky. Notice the two nearby stars, Rigel Kentaurus and Hadar. Rigel Kentaurus is more commonly known as the alpha star in the constellation ... Full Story

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