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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Comet Hartley 2’

Star Night at the LTO, December 17

Star Night at the LTO, December 17

Friday, December 17, 2010  7:00 – 11:00 p.m. Public Star Night at the Little Thompson Observatory, 850 Spartan Ave at Berthoud High School (park east of the high school; directions are posted on www.starkids.org.) The guest speaker for this Friday is Dr John Ristvey, a Senior Director at Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL). The title of his talk will be: "Comet Mysteries Revealed: A tale of two spacecraft, three comets, and four missions - Oh ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 29, Last quarter moon marks

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 29, Last quarter moon marks direction of Earth’s orbital motion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Spot Comet Hartley 2 at the feet of Gemini before moonrise tonight The cool thing about the last quarter moon is that it shows you in which direction our planet Earth is revolving around the sun. At quarter moon, the lunar disk is half-illuminated in sunshine and half-engulfed in the moon’s own shadow. The terminator – the shadow line dividing the lunar day from the lunar night – shows you where it’s sunset on ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 30, What bright star flashes

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 30, What bright star flashes red and green in northeast?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Every year in late September and early October, we get questions from people who see a bright star twinkling with red and green flashes, low in the northeastern sky. Capella is a golden star when seen higher up in the sky. If you could travel to it in space, you’d find that it’s actually two golden stars, both with roughly the same surface temperature as our local star, the sun . . . but both larger and brighter than the ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 28, How to find the

EarthSky Tonight—September 28, How to find the loneliest star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Which star is loneliest? Most people would say the answer is Fomalhaut, a bright star in the constellation Piscis Austrinus the Southern Fish. The coming month or so is the best time to see this star. So, go outside now … and learn to keep company with the loneliest star. On this autumn night, at about 8 to 9 p.m., look for a solitary star that’s peeking out at you just above the southeast horizon. Do you see it? No ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 22, Harvest moon,

EarthSky Tonight—September 22,  Harvest moon, Jupiter, Autumn equinox

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object in late September The equinox falls at 9:09 p.m. on this Wednesday evening, according to clocks set to Mountain Daylight Time. That translates to 3:09 a.m. tomorrow – on Thursday, September 23 – Universal Time. So some calendars will show today as the equinox, and others will show tomorrow. Everything you need to know about the autumnal equinox of 2010 Here are ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 17, Close-up on

EarthSky Tonight—September 17,  Close-up on constellation Perseus the Hero and Demon Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Will you be able to see the ‘demon’ star in the constellation Perseus the Hero tonight? Yesterday’s chart showed you how to use the constellation Cassiopeia to locate Perseus in the northeast at mid to late evening. The brightest star in Perseus is Alpha Persei, whose proper name is Mirfak, pronounced MEER-fak. Comet Hartley 2 passes in front of Cassiopeia, Perseus in autumn 2010 Meanwhile, the best-known star ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 16, Cassiopeia and Perseus in

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 16, Cassiopeia and Perseus in northeast on September evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At this time of year, if you are in the northern hemisphere, try looking northeast at mid to late evening for two prominent constellations, Cassiopeia and Perseus. Learn these constellations now, and you may be able catch Comet Hartley 2 in front of Cassiopeia in late September and the first week in October. Then watch as the comet passes through Perseus until October 17. Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object ... Full Story

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