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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Deborah Byrd’

Earthsky Tonight — Young moon and Venus low after

Earthsky Tonight — Young moon and Venus low after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org It is nearly spring in the northern hemisphere. The March equinox - when the sun crosses the celestial equator from south to north – will fall on March 20. This time of year – near the spring equinox – is the most favorable for spotting a young moon. See if you can catch one today after sunset by the blazing planet Venus. A young moon is a thin waxing crescent moon visible in the west in evening twilight. ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight: March 15—The westward shift of

Earthsky Tonight: March 15—The westward shift of Orion and all the stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We got this question: “Orion seems to have moved and turned considerably in the last two weeks. Will Orion disappear before summer?” The answer is that all the stars and constellations shift westward as the seasons pass . . . and they also move westward in the course of a single night. Orion is no exception. Exactly when Orion will disappear from the evening sky – into the sunset – depends on your latitude. The ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—March 13, Use the Big Dipper to

Earthsky Tonight—March 13, Use the Big Dipper to locate the Hunting Dogs

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org You can locate the Big Dipper in the northeast in mid- to late evening around now. The Big Dipper is part of the constellation Ursa Major, the Greater Bear. In addition, if you can find the Big Dipper, you can find two Hunting Dogs seen by the ancient stargazers to be nipping at the Bear’s heels. The Hunting Dogs are a separate constellation: tiny Canes Venatici. You will need a dark sky to see these two little ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—March 12, Tangle of stars in

Earthsky Tonight—March 12, Tangle of stars in Berenice’s Hair

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org What we are about to describe requires a dark sky to be seen: a faraway cluster of stars known as “Coma Berenices.” How can you spot it? One way is to use the famous constellation Leo the Lion, now in the east each evening. Leo is relatively easy to see. The front part of the Lion looks like a backwards question mark, and the back part is a little triangle, which includes the star Denebola, marked on ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 26, 2010: Stars in the

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 26, 2010: Stars in the daytime

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org People often ask if stars are up there, beyond our blue sky, during the day. The answer is surely yes, because Earth is a planet in space, surrounded on all sides by stars. Here is a view looking southeast at mid-morning today or tomorrow. Of course, you really cannot see the stars, but they are there. The constellation behind the sun around now is Aquarius the Water Bearer. This is true each year between ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – February 14, 2010: The Double

Earthsky Tonight – February 14, 2010: The Double Cluster in Perseus

Face the northwestern horizon this evening – above and to the right of the place where the sun set on the western horizon – but mid- to late evening. Here you can find the Double Cluster in the constellation Perseus. These are two open stars clusters, known as “H” and “Chi” Persei (also called NGC 884 and 869). How to find them? First, you need a dark sky. As you work your way up from the northwest horizon you’ll see the famous constellation Cassiopeia forming a ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 13, 2010: Cassiopeia is

Earthsky Tonight, February 13, 2010: Cassiopeia is shaped like an ‘M’ or ‘W’

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Erick wrote, “Do you have any information on Cassiopeia’s Chair?” Erick, you have used the lovely old-fashioned name for this constellation. In the 1930s, the International Astronomical Union gave this constellation an official name of Cassiopeia the Queen, but skywatchers still see the chair, and speak of it. Cassiopeia was a queen in ancient Greek mythology. According to legend, she boasted she was ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 12, 2010: Use Big

Earthsky Tonight, February 12, 2010: Use Big Dipper’s Pointers to find Polaris

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you can find the Big Dipper in the northern sky in mid to late evening tonight, you can find the North Star, Polaris. The Big Dipper is not a constellation. Instead, it is an asterism, just a recognizable pattern of stars on the sky’s dome. It is part of the constellation Ursa Major, the Greater Bear. A well-known trick for finding the North Star, or Polaris, is that the two outermost stars in the bowl of ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 11, 2010: For those at

Earthsky Tonight, February 11, 2010: For those at southerly latitudes, Canopus!

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is a star that northern stargazers rarely see. It is Canopus, and it is the second-brightest star in the entire sky. You won’t see this star from the northern U.S. or similar latitudes. But northern skywatchers who travel south in winter – or people in latitudes like those in the southern U.S. – enjoy watching this star. You can always find Canopus by first locating Sirius, the sky’s brightest ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 10, 2010: You need a dark

Earthsky Tonight, February 10, 2010: You need a dark sky to see Eridanus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is one of the sky’s most graceful and beautiful constellations, if you have access to a very dark sky. You won’t see this one from the city, or even the suburbs. Eridanus the River begins near the star Rigel in the constellation Orion. It wells up in a great loop before ambling back down toward the southern horizon. Eridanus is one of the longest and faintest constellations. It’s variously said ... Full Story

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