July 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Friday, July 25, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Doug Nichols’

Doug Nichols—scientist, colleague, mentor, friend

By Gary Wamsley The Recorder Online Several of us from Berthoud braved the slick streets and Denver traffic to pay our respects to friend and neighbor, Doug Nichols. For the celebration of his life, we joined his family, other friends and colleagues in the Ricketson Auditorium  at the Denver Museum of Science and Nature. They came from afar to honor a man who obviously meant so much to them. The collaborators on his most recent research project came from Japan and Europe to pay ... Full Story

Douglas Nichols, Ph.D., 1942-2010

Douglas Nichols, Ph.D., 1942-2010

February 19, 1942 – January 21, 2010 Doug Nichols, Ph. D., paleontologist and Berthoud resident, passed away unexpectedly on Jan. 21, 2010, at the age of 67. Born in Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y., he was the son of Kenneth C. and Beatrice O. Nichols. Doug lived in Long Island, N.Y. and New Jersey while growing up. Since settling in Berthoud in 2005, Doug enthusiastically embraced life here in Berthoud. He made so many friends in the short time he lived here and ... Full Story

Former Recorder columnist Doug Nichols passes away

We were saddened to learn that our friend and colleague Doug Nicols passed away this afternoon. Doug had taken a fall in December and suffered a broken leg. He seemed to be recovering when he suddenly lost consciousness and was rushed to the hospital where he remained in a coma until today. The preliminary report indicates a blood clot in the brain. Nichols was a retired micropaleontologist who volunteered at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and wrote the column "Our Natural World" for ... Full Story

What was Johnny Appleseed up to?

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder Autumn is apple time across America — crisp fruit and sweet cider. The season may bring to mind that American folk hero Johnny Appleseed. You probably know him from the 1958 Disney film “American Legends,” which portrayed him as a young man traveling on the western frontier in the early 1800s, unselfishly planting apple trees for settlers to enjoy. But the true story of John Chapman, better known as Johnny Appleseed, is somewhat ... Full Story

Those autumn leaves

Those autumn leaves

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder “Those falling leaves drift by your window, those autumn leaves of red and gold....” So goes the old song. Here in Colorado, those autumn leaves are mostly gold: aspens and cottonwoods. For red, maples are the best but there are none of those in our native flora. Nonetheless, few sights equal groves of golden aspens against crisp blue skies in our mountains. In any event, why the beautiful colors as autumn arrives? And, why are those leaves ... Full Story

The Amazing Fossils of Florissant

The Amazing Fossils of Florissant

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder The previous “Our Natural World” column covered the origin of the 34-million-year-old lake deposits at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument and the legislative struggle to have the site preserved for the public as part of the National Park system. This column provides some details about the fossils present in this unique area. Most prominent are enormous petrified trunks of prehistoric sequoia trees, relatives of the giant redwoods of ... Full Story

Preserving a Paleontologic Treasure Chest

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder Aug. 20, 2009, was the 40th anniversary of the establishment of Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, a site maintained by the National Park Service for the preservation of spectacular plant and insect fossils, including huge petrified trunks of fossil sequoias, ancient relatives of the giant redwoods of California. The site is located west of Colorado Springs, just south of the town of Florissant, Colo. The efforts to save the site and its ... Full Story

Dinosaurs and Other Colorado Fossils

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder As dinosaur lovers of all ages in our state know, the Colorado State Fossil is the stegosaur (Stegosaurus stenops). This familiar herbivorous dinosaur with rows of plates along its back was officially adopted by executive order of Gov. Richard Lamm in 1982, following a two-year campaign by schoolchildren. Stegosaurs roamed Colorado during the late Jurassic period of geological time, about 145-150 million years ago. They were large animals, weighing an ... Full Story

Colorado’s Oldest Living Residents

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder Have you met one of Colorado’s oldest living residents? No, it is not that cranky, old guy down the street; it is the bristlecone pine. They are among the oldest living organisms anywhere in the world. There are some bristlecone pines in Berthoud, but they are just youngsters. The really old ones — some more than 1,500 years old — live in the Rocky Mountains. The Colorado bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata) is sometimes known by the common name ... Full Story

Colorado’s Natural Fireworks—Volcanoes

By Doug Nichols Berthoud Recorder Recently, fireworks have been heard around town, but they were nothing compared with Colorado’s natural fireworks -- volcanoes. Volcanoes in Colorado? Yes! Well, not recently, but definitely in the geological past. The most recent volcanic eruption in Colorado took place about 4,200 years ago near the present day town of Dotsero, by the confluence of the Colorado and Eagle Rivers, in the north-central part of the state. Interstate 70 cuts across the ... Full Story

Page 1 of 212