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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘history’

On This Day, October 26, 1881

On This Day, October 26, 1881

  Shootout at the OK Corral On this day in 1881, the Earp brothers face off against the Clanton-McLaury gang in a legendary shootout at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. After silver was discovered nearby in 1877, Tombstone quickly grew into one of the richest mining towns in the Southwest. Wyatt Earp, a former Kansas police officer working as a bank security guard, and his brothers, Morgan and Virgil, the town marshal, represented "law and order" in Tombstone, though they ... Full Story

On This Day, October 25, 1944

On This Day, October 25, 1944

  First kamikaze attack of the war begins On this day in 1944, during the Battle of the Leyte Gulf, the Japanese deploy kamikaze ("divine wind") suicide bombers against American warships for the first time. It will prove costly--to both sides. This decision to employ suicide bombers against the American fleet at Leyte, an island of the Philippines, was based on the failure of conventional naval and aerial engagements to stop the American offensive. Declared Japanese naval Capt. ... Full Story

On this Day: October 22, 1962

On this Day: October 22, 1962

Cuban Missile Crisis In a televised speech of extraordinary gravity, President John F. Kennedy announces that U.S. spy planes have discovered Soviet missile bases in Cuba. These missile sites—under construction but nearing completion—housed medium-range missiles capable of striking a number of major cities in the United States, including Washington, D.C. Kennedy announced that he was ordering a naval "quarantine" of Cuba to prevent Soviet ships from transporting any more offensive ... Full Story

On this Day: October 21, 1797

On this Day: October 21, 1797

USS Constitution launched The USS Constitution, a 44-gun U.S. Navy frigate built to fight Barbary pirates off the coast of Tripoli, is launched in Boston Harbor. The vessel performed commendably during the Barbary conflicts, and in 1805 a peace treaty with Tripoli was signed on the Constitution's deck. During the War of 1812, the Constitution won its enduring nickname "Old Ironsides" after defeating the British warship Guerriére in a furious engagement off the coast of Nova Scotia. ... Full Story

On this Day: October 20, 1803

On this Day: October 20, 1803

U.S. Senate ratifies the Louisiana Purchase On this day in 1803, the U.S. Senate approves a treaty with France providing for the purchase of the territory of Louisiana, which would double the size of the United States. At the end of 18th century, the Spanish technically owned Louisiana, the huge region west of the Mississippi that had once been claimed by France and named for its monarch, King Louis XIV. Despite Spanish ownership, American settlers in search of new land were already ... Full Story

On this Day: October 17, 1931

On this Day: October 17, 1931

  Capone goes to prison   On this day in 1931, gangster Al Capone is sentenced to 11 years in prison for tax evasion and fined $80,000, signaling the downfall of one of the most notorious criminals of the 1920s and 1930s. Alphonse Gabriel Capone was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1899 to Italian immigrants. He was expelled from school at 14, joined a gang and earned his nickname "Scarface" after being sliced across the cheek during a fight. By 1920, Capone had moved ... Full Story

On this Day: October 16, 1859

    Oct 16, 1859: Abolitionist John Brown leads a raid on Harpers Ferry Abolitionist John Brown leads a small group on a raid against a federal armory in Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), in an attempt to start an armed slave revolt and destroy the institution of slavery. Born in Connecticut in 1800 and raised in Ohio, Brown came from a staunchly Calvinist and antislavery family. He spent much of his life failing at a variety of businesses--he declared ... Full Story

Transportation In Weld County

Transportation In Weld County

  WELD COUNTY, Colo. – This month, the Weld County 150th Anniversary web site takes a look at the history of transportation in Weld County. From the surveyors who crossed the county on foot, measuring the West 66 feet at a time, to the railroads that linked Weld County to the rest of the state and the country, our county’s transportation history is interesting and unique. Leon Sievers, a professional land surveyor for the county, explains how the West, including Weld County, was ... Full Story

This Week In College Football History

This Week In College Football History

Jan. 3 - Jan. 9 As part of an ongoing series throughout the fall, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame posts This Week in College Football History, which takes a look back at some of college football's landmark moments over the last 141 years. FEATURED MOMENT: January 4, 2000- College Football Hall of Fame coach Bobby Bowden led Florida State to its second national title in the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans as the No. 1 Seminoles topped No. 2 ... Full Story

This Week in College Football History

This Week in College Football History

  Dec. 20 - Dec. 26 December 22, 1979- College Football Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno and Penn State upset No. 15 Tulane at the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, 9-6. Despite out-rushing Tulane by 250 yards and posting 27 first downs, the Nittany Lions managed just three Herb Menhardt field goals to provide the winning margin. The victory was Paterno's seventh bowl win. He will look for his 25th bowl win versus Florida in the Outback Bowl on Jan. 1 in Tampa. OTHER NOTABLE ... Full Story

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