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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Jupiter’

Sky Tonight—May 6, Mercury at greatest morning

Sky Tonight—May 6, Mercury at greatest morning elongation May 7

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Mercury, the solar system’s innermost planet, reaches its greatest western elongation from the sun on Saturday, May 7. Because Mercury is farthest west of the sun at present, this world now rises into the morning sky before sunrise – but how much before depends on where you live on the globe. The farther north you live, the closer Mercury rises to sunrise. The farther south you live, the greater the period of ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 29, Five planets before sunrise

Sky Tonight—April 29, Five planets before sunrise April 30. .

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Only Venus easily visible We show the moon and planets for about 30 minutes before sunrise tomorrow (Saturday, April 30) as seen from North American mid-northern latitudes. At mid-northern latitudes all around the world, the only two worlds that you are likely to see before sunrise tomorrow are the moon and blazing planet Venus. Look for them low in the east some 60 to 30 minutes before sunup. Binoculars might ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 16, Smallest and largest planets

Sky Tonight—March 16, Smallest and largest planets in conjunction

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The planets Mercury and Jupiter meet up for a conjunction today. Conjunction means that these two worlds stand north and south of one another in right ascension. (Right ascension on the sky’s dome is the equivalent of longitude here on Earth.) Mercury swings north of Jupiter at 17 hours Universal Time (12:00 noon Central Daylight Time) on March 16. In the Americas, this conjunction takes place during the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 15, Jupiter is your guide to

Sky Tonight—March 15, Jupiter is your guide to Mercury in mid-March 2011

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you can find the blazing planet Jupiter in your western sky after sunset, you are virtually assured of seeing Mercury, the solar system’s innermost planet. As long as your western horizon is free of obstruction – like houses, trees, or cloud cover – Mercury should be yours tonight. Remember to start your search soon after sunset, because these two worlds will set about 80 minutes after sundown (at ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 8, The Summer Triangle, a signpost

Sky Tonight—March 8, The Summer Triangle, a signpost for all seasons

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org To see Jupiter in March 2011, look west soon after sunset As seen from our northern temperate latitudes, the three brilliant stars of the Summer Triangle – Vega, Deneb and Altair – are out for at least part of the night every night of the year. Presently, the Summer Triangle shines in the eastern sky at and before dawn. Like the Big Dipper, the Summer Triangle is an asterism – a pattern of stars that is not ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 7, Mercury lurks beneath moon and

Sky Tonight—March 7, Mercury lurks beneath moon and Jupiter at dusk

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you have clear skies and live in the northern hemisphere, you should have no trouble spotting the waxing crescent moon and the blazing planet Jupiter after sunset, but the planet Mercury is a different story altogether. At mid-northern latitudes around the world tonight, Mercury follows the sun beneath the horizon around 45 minutes after sunset. The moon and Jupiter stay out until after dark. Looking for a sky ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 6, Crescent moon and Jupiter after

Sky Tonight—March 6, Crescent moon and Jupiter after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org As seen from North America on March 6, the waxing crescent moon and dazzling planet Jupiter shine nearly side by side in the western sky after sunset. Understanding moon phases Given clear skies, virtually everyone in the northern hemisphere will see the two brightest celestial bodies of the March evening sky – the moon and Jupiter – at dusk and nightfall tonight. In Europe, Africa, and Asia, people will see ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 5, Young moon and Jupiter low in

Sky Tonight—March 5, Young moon and Jupiter low in west after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org For us in North America, March 5 presents a golden opportunity to catch a very young moon. As seen from North America, tonight’s waxing crescent moon is less than 30 hours old. In other words, the moon will make its first appearance in the March evening sky less than 30 hours after the moon turns new. You will need a level horizon and crystal-clear skies to see the very thin lunar crescent in the west after ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 21, Zodiacal light is glowing

Sky Tonight—Feb 21, Zodiacal light is glowing pyramid in west after dark

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Moonless February and March evenings present the best time of year to see zodiacal light in the northern hemisphere evening sky. The light appears when all traces of twilight have left the sky. It looks like a hazy pyramid of light in the west after true darkness falls. This light can be noticeable and easy to see from latitudes like those in the southern U.S. I’ve seen it many times from the latitude of ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 20, Moon, Saturn, Spica rise in late

Sky Tonight—Feb 20, Moon, Saturn, Spica rise in late evening

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Jupiter is the bright object in the west after sunset You will have to stay up late to see the waning gibbous moon, the planet Saturn, and the star Spica tonight. Alternatively, you can wake up early tomorrow. Our chart shows the eastern sky for mid-northern North American latitudes somewhere around 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. tonight. The sky scene will look similar for mid-northern latitudes in Europe and Asia, ... Full Story

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