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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Mars’

Earthsky Tonight—August 7, Venus, Mars, Saturn form

Earthsky Tonight—August 7, Venus, Mars, Saturn form planetary trio in west

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Around August 7 and 8, look in the west after sunset for the planets Venus, Mars and Saturn as they form what is known as a planetary trio. Around August 7 and 8, look in the west after sunset for the planets Venus, Mars and Saturn as they form what is known as a planetary trio. A planetary trio is a grouping of three planets that fits inside a circle that is only 5 degrees wide. Typically, a binocular field spans about 5 ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 1, Mercury, Venus, Mars,

Earthsky Tonight—August 1, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The western sky after evening twilight has hosted a trio of planets for the past several weeks. However, there is room for one more! Mercury, the closest planet to the sun, has been moving away from the solar glare to accompany Venus, Mars, and Saturn. Horizon-hugging Mercury does not stay visible long, however. Brilliant Venus is the easiest to spot at daylight wanes. Look for Mercury soon after sunset as the brightest ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 30, Mars and Saturn closest

Earthsky Tonight—July 30, Mars and Saturn closest for 2010

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The first “star” to pop out into the evening twilight is no star at all but the dazzling planet Venus. After sunset, look westward for the brightest point of light that you can find. That will be Venus, the most brilliant celestial body to bedeck the heavens after the sun and moon. EarthSky’s meteor shower guide for 2010 As dusk deepens into night, notice the visible pair of planets to the upper left of Venus: ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 27, Saturn, Mars, Venus –

Earthsky Tonight—July 27, Saturn, Mars, Venus – close pairing of Regulus and Mercury

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The planets Saturn, Mars and Venus are still in the west after sunset, to the delight of stargazers across the globe. In addition, the planet Mercury –our solar system’s innermost world – teams up with Regulus around now in the same part of the sky. Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Tonight, Mercury and Regulus form the year’s closest pairing of a planet with a first-magnitude star. Look ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 24,Why the hottest weather is

Earthsky Tonight—July 24,Why the hottest weather is not on the longest day

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Look westward at nightfall to see three planets in the July evening sky. In their order of brightness, these worlds are Venus, Saturn and Mars. Venus outshines Saturn and Mars by leaps and bounds. Venus is the first “star” to pop into view after sunset. If you keep watching the western sky into early August, you will see these three form a tight cluster in the west after sunset. EarthSky’s meteor guide for ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—Moon close to Mars. Venus, Mercury,

Earthsky Tonight—Moon close to Mars. Venus, Mercury, Saturn nearby

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Have you been watching the string of planets adorning the July evening sky after sunset? If so, you might have noticed that the order of the planets from up to down – Saturn, Mars, Venus and Mercury – has remained steady throughout the month. However, the moon’s position relative to the planetary line-up has been changing, with the moon now climbing this stairway of planets day by day by day by day! Yesterday ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 13, Young moon, Mercury sit

Earthsky Tonight—July 13, Young moon, Mercury sit close to horizon after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the sky for mid-northern North American latitudes at about 45 minutes after sunset. If you have a level horizon and crystal-clear skies, you might catch the thin waxing crescent moon and the planet Mercury next to the horizon. Mercury sets about one hour after the sun and the moon sets about one hour and 15 minutes after. So, they’ll be hard to catch in the twilight glare. Try binoculars! Looking for ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 27: Latest sunsets of the year

EarthSky Tonight-June 27: Latest sunsets of the year in late June

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org For people living around 40 degrees north latitude, the latest sunset of the year happens around now. In the southern hemisphere, at 40 degrees south latitude, it is the year’s latest sunrise that is happening around now. That is in spite of the fact that the longest or shortest day of the year (in terms of daylight) took place about a week ago, on the June 21 solstice. To celebrate these late June sunsets, our sky ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 18: A half-moon Joins Saturn

Earthsky Tonight—June 18: A half-moon Joins Saturn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight, you have another planet-packed evening in store, with a couple of brilliant beacons to point the way. Dazzling Venus is visible in the west as evening falls, and the first-quarter moon shines in the southwest as seen from the northern hemisphere. The brightest “star” near the half-lit moon is Saturn. Thanks to its majestic system of rings, it has become an icon of “outer space” and staple of ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 17, View Mars tonight via

Earthsky Tonight—June 17, View Mars tonight via reflected sunlight nearly 28 minutes old

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The crescent moon glides by Mars tonight, making it easy to identify the planet, which has been getting dimmer for the past few months. If you face west about an hour after sunset, Mars is the yellow or orange “star” just to the north of the moon. Saturn, very slightly brighter than Mars, is a bit farther from and above the moon. Mars is known as the “Red Planet,” but most people do not see it with a truly red ... Full Story

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