February 2016
S M T W T F S
« Jan    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Monday, February 8, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Mars’

Earthsky Tonight—May 18, Moon near Mars, Castor,

Earthsky Tonight—May 18, Moon near Mars, Castor, Pollux

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At nightfall, the waxing crescent moon lines up with Castor and Pollux, the two brightest stars in the constellation Gemini the Twins. People often refer to these stars as ‘The Twins’ but they aren’t really twins at all. At a distance of about 34 light-years, Pollux wins acclaim as the closest giant star to our solar system. It’s one of the very few giant stars in our galaxy known to harbor a planet. Castor is farther ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 21, Moon and Mars tonight,

Earthsky Tonight — April 21, Moon and Mars tonight, Lyrid meteors before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org As soon as darkness falls tonight, look for the planet Mars quite close to the moon, which reached its first quarter phase today at 1:20 p.m. Central Time. The moon and Mars remain close together throughout the night, and descend westward throughout the evening hours. These two worlds set beneath the western horizon in the wee hours after midnight. The annual Lyrid meteor shower streaks the nighttime tonight from late night until ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive cluster pair up in mid April

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org These mid-April evenings provide you with a golden opportunity to see the Beehive star cluster, the crown jewel of the constellation Cancer the Crab. The moon will be absent from the sky for the next several evenings, featuring dark nights for observing this deep-sky treasure. The Beehive is faintly visible to the unaided eye in a dark country sky. However, you really need binoculars to transform this hazy smudge of light into the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 25, 2010: Moon and Mars

Earthsky Tonight — March 25, 2010: Moon and Mars guide to Beehive star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you observed the moon last night, you know that the planet Mars appeared to the upper left of the moon. This evening, you will find Mars as a bright orangish “star” to the upper right of the moon. You will need a medium sized telescope and good seeing conditions to see much on Mars, but a small telescope or even a good pair of binoculars will show you many features on the moon. The large dark spots are lava plains or ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 24, Moon close to Mars

Earthsky Tonight — March 24, Moon close to Mars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you have been tracking the moon over the past few evenings, you know that it has been passing through some of the major players in the late winter, early spring skies. It skimmed the Pleiades star cluster on Saturday, then it plodded through Taurus the Bull, across Gemini the Twins and after midnight tonight it slips into Cancer the Crab. However, unlike Taurus and Gemini, Cancer is a very faint constellation, often not ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — Moon between Capella and

Earthsky Tonight — Moon between Capella and Betelgeuse

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The rather wide waxing crescent moon will be shining in between two brilliant stars tonight. Capella, the brightest star in the constellation Auriga, will be beaming north of the moon, while Betelgeuse, the star marking the right shoulder in the constellation Orion, will be shining south of the moon. The moon swings full circle in front of the starry heavens in a little over 27 days. Twenty-seven days from now – on the night ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—March 11: Mars stationary in front

Earthsky Tonight—March 11: Mars stationary in front of stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Almanacs say the planet Mars is “stationary” today. However, stationary doesn’t mean that Mars stays in the same place in Earth’s sky all night tonight. Mars actually shines in the southern sky at mid-evening, and crosses the sky westward throughout the night. This ruddy world sets beneath the western horizon before dawn tomorrow. Does stationary mean that Mars is staying still in its orbit around the sun? Hardly! Mars ... Full Story

Page 3 of 3123
41,176
SPAM BLOCKED