July 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Friday, July 25, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘new moon’

Sky Tonight—May 3, Drive a spike to the star Spica

Sky Tonight—May 3, Drive a spike to the star Spica in May

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Yesterday we talked about learning to ‘follow the arc’ to the star Arcturus in the constellation Bootes. You just follow the curve in the Big Dipper’s handle until you see this orange star. Tonight, let the Big Dipper introduce you to another bright star. This star is Spica in the constellation Virgo the Maiden. You can ‘follow the arc’ to Arcturus AND ‘drive a spike’ or ‘speed on’ to ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 3, Saturn closest, brightest,

Sky Tonight—April 3, Saturn closest, brightest, opposite the sun

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The best time of 2011 to see Saturn is here. Planet Earth flies between the sun and Saturn tonight, according to U.S. clocks. Our fast movement in orbit brings us between Saturn and the sun every year, to an event called opposition by astronomers. In other words, Saturn is now opposite the sun in Earth’s sky. At opposition, Saturn rises in the east at sunset and sets in the west at sunrise. So Saturn is ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 4, Bright star Arcturus is a

Sky Tonight—March 4, Bright star Arcturus is a harbinger of spring

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The gloriously bright star Arcturus rises into your east-northeastern sky around 9 p.m. tonight. This yellow-orange beauty – like any brilliant star – sparkles wildly when it hovers near the horizon. Arcturus is the brightest star in the constellation Bootes, which represents a Herdsman – though to our modern eyes, this star formation might look more like a kite or snow cone. Arcturus is the fourth ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 2, Cassiopeia is shaped like an

Sky Tonight—February 2, Cassiopeia is shaped like an ‘M’ or ‘W’

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Erick wrote, “Do you have any information on Cassiopeia’s Chair?” Erick, you have used the lovely old-fashioned name for this constellation. In the 1930s, the International Astronomical Union gave this constellation the official name of Cassiopeia the Queen. Nevertheless, skywatchers still see the chair, and speak of it. Cassiopeia was an Ethiopian queen in ancient Greek mythology. According to ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 4, Solar eclipse today, but not

Sky Tonight—January 4, Solar eclipse today, but not in the Americas

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Photo courtesy of junction’s photostream, some rights reserved. If you live on the right spot on Earth, you can observe the partial eclipse of the sun today, on Tuesday, January 4, 2011. Given clear skies, the following places will see the partial solar eclipse: most of Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East, and the western and central portions of Asia. Sorry, America … no eclipse for us. The ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight: January 15, 2010 – New moon

Earthsky Tonight: January 15, 2010 – New moon and solar eclipse on January 15

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The first of this year’s 2 solar eclipses takes place today, on January 15, 2010. The second solar eclipse will fall on July 11, 2010. Neither eclipse, though, is visible from North America. If you are in a position to observe today’s eclipse, remember to use proper eye protection. Many people in Africa and Asia will see a partial eclipse of the sun today. But to view the annular eclipse ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight: January 14, 2010 – Annular

Earthsky Tonight: January 14, 2010 – Annular eclipse in Africa and Asia on January 15

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org There are at least 2 solar eclipses in every calendar year. A solar eclipse happens when the new moon passes in front of the sun, blocking out the view of the sun’s disk. If the moon totally covers over the sun, it’s called a total solar eclipse. If the moon partially covers over the sun, it’s a partial solar eclipse. The first of the year’s two solar eclipses takes place tomorrow (Friday, ... Full Story

Page 1 of 11