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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Orion’

Earthsky Tonight — April 2, 2010: Moon and Scorpius

Earthsky Tonight — April 2, 2010: Moon and Scorpius rise after Orion sets

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is the waning gibbous moon near the star Antares in the southeast sky shortly after midnight on April 3. If you are looking for the moon on the evening of April 2, you won’t find it. The moon will not rise tonight until after the middle of the night – at about the same time that the constellation Orion’s bright star Betelgeuse sets in the west. Tonight, from about one after midnight until dawn, the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — Moon between Capella and

Earthsky Tonight — Moon between Capella and Betelgeuse

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The rather wide waxing crescent moon will be shining in between two brilliant stars tonight. Capella, the brightest star in the constellation Auriga, will be beaming north of the moon, while Betelgeuse, the star marking the right shoulder in the constellation Orion, will be shining south of the moon. The moon swings full circle in front of the starry heavens in a little over 27 days. Twenty-seven days from now – on ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight: March 15—The westward shift of

Earthsky Tonight: March 15—The westward shift of Orion and all the stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We got this question: “Orion seems to have moved and turned considerably in the last two weeks. Will Orion disappear before summer?” The answer is that all the stars and constellations shift westward as the seasons pass . . . and they also move westward in the course of a single night. Orion is no exception. Exactly when Orion will disappear from the evening sky – into the sunset – depends on your latitude. The ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 24, 2010: Moon near Mars,

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 24, 2010: Moon near Mars, Castor, Pollux

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The big and bright waxing gibbous moon erases many stars from the blackboard of night tonight. Nonetheless, the two brightest stars in the constellation Gemini the Twins – Castor and Pollux – should be able to withstand the moonlit glare. The moon is near with Castor and Pollux this evening. However, you can’t count on the moon to guide you to Castor and Pollux every night. Tomorrow, at this same time, you ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – February 20, 2010: Orion

Earthsky Tonight – February 20, 2010: Orion shows you the ecliptic and summer solstice point

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Diana asks, "Why is the waxing moon always so high in the evening sky in late winter and early spring?" In a nutshell, Diana, it is because the ecliptic arcs high across the evening sky right now. The ecliptic is the Earth’s orbital plane projected onto stellar sphere, or the dome of sky. The ecliptic is often shown on sky charts because the moon and planets are found on or near the ecliptic. If you are familiar ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 10, 2010: You need a dark

Earthsky Tonight, February 10, 2010: You need a dark sky to see Eridanus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is one of the sky’s most graceful and beautiful constellations, if you have access to a very dark sky. You won’t see this one from the city, or even the suburbs. Eridanus the River begins near the star Rigel in the constellation Orion. It wells up in a great loop before ambling back down toward the southern horizon. Eridanus is one of the longest and faintest constellations. It’s variously said ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 9, 2010: The Hare and the

Earthsky Tonight, February 9, 2010: The Hare and the Dove below the Hunter

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you look southward around 8 p.m., you will easily notice a short, straight row of three medium bright stars. These stars represent the Belt of Orion the Hunter. Also, notice the star Sirius. On old sky maps, the mighty Hunter of the ancient myths is seen poised with an upraised club and shield, as though fending off the raging Bull, Taurus. Meanwhile, two meek animals seem to cower at the Hunter’s ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 4, 2010: Blue-white Rigel

Earthsky Tonight, February 4, 2010: Blue-white Rigel is at the foot of Orion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The three sparkling blue-white stars of Orion’s Belt are easy to spot. As viewed from this hemisphere, this compact line of stars can be found in the southern sky at nightfall. Look in the south to southwestern sky any evening around now. Chances are the pattern you’ll pick out Orion! You may note that Orion’s two brightest stars – Betelgeuse and Rigel – lodge at an equal distance above and below ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 3, 2010: Somber red

Earthsky Tonight, February 3, 2010: Somber red Betelgeuse shines in the shoulder of Orion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At nightfall and early evening, people at mid-northern latitudes see the famous Belt of Orion – three stars in a short, straight row – about halfway between the southern horizon and straight overhead. Later at night, you will find Orion in the southwest. Above Orion’s Belt, you will find one of the sky’s most famous stars, ruddy-hued Betelgeuse. Kids especially like Betelgeuse, because its name sounds so much ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight- January 24: Moon and Pleiades in

Earthsky Tonight- January 24: Moon and Pleiades in south at nightfall

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon and the Pleiades star cluster are found high in the southern sky at nightfall and early evening. Although the moonlit glare may make it difficult to see this tiny, dipper-shape cluster of starlets tonight, be sure to check out the Pleiades on a dark, moonless night. Starting the first weekend of February, the moon will leave the evening sky for at least a week, staging the Pleiades in ... Full Story

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