October 2014
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Perseus’

Sky Tonight—February 3, Double Cluster of Perseus in

Sky Tonight—February 3, Double Cluster of Perseus in northwest

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org To find the gorgeous Double Cluster in the constellation Perseus, face north to northwest as darkness falls this evening. Here you can find the Double Cluster in the constellation Perseus. These are two open star clusters, known as “H” and “Chi” Persei (also called NGC 884 and 869). How to find them? First, you need a dark sky. Second, you may need binoculars, as the Double Cluster is only ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Algol, a famous variable star,

EarthSky Tonight—Algol, a famous variable star, dimmest tonight

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Algol – perhaps the most famous variable star in all the heavens – will be dimmest tonight at 8:29 p.m. Mountain Standard Time. Even at its dimmest, Algol is still bright enough to see with the eye. Algol is what astronomers call an eclipsing binary star. In other words, the single point of light that we see as Algol is really two stars. Like clockwork, these two stars revolve around each other every ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Nov 5, Constellation

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Nov 5, Constellation Cassiopeia high in northeast on November evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The constellation Cassiopeia the Queen can be found high in the northeast in the evening at this time of year, not far from Polaris, the North Star. Cassiopeia is an easy constellation to recognize because it is small and compact and looks like the letter M or W, depending on what time of night and what time of year it is. The constellation on today’s chart used to be known among astronomers and skywatchers alike as ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 30, As Halloween approaches,

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 30, As Halloween approaches, find the Ghoul Star of Perseus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org As Halloween approaches, try looking for the star Beta Persei, otherwise known as Algol in the constellation Perseus. This star’s proper name comes from the Arabic for head of the ghoul, or head of the demon. This star is known to vary in brightness over a regular time interval. The cycle lasts exactly 2 days, 20 hours and 49 minutes. All the while, the star remains visible to the eye. Algol’s brightness variations are ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 17, Close-up on

EarthSky Tonight—September 17,  Close-up on constellation Perseus the Hero and Demon Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Will you be able to see the ‘demon’ star in the constellation Perseus the Hero tonight? Yesterday’s chart showed you how to use the constellation Cassiopeia to locate Perseus in the northeast at mid to late evening. The brightest star in Perseus is Alpha Persei, whose proper name is Mirfak, pronounced MEER-fak. Comet Hartley 2 passes in front of Cassiopeia, Perseus in autumn 2010 Meanwhile, the best-known star ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 16, Cassiopeia and Perseus in

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 16, Cassiopeia and Perseus in northeast on September evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At this time of year, if you are in the northern hemisphere, try looking northeast at mid to late evening for two prominent constellations, Cassiopeia and Perseus. Learn these constellations now, and you may be able catch Comet Hartley 2 in front of Cassiopeia in late September and the first week in October. Then watch as the comet passes through Perseus until October 17. Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 13, Moon and Venus, more

EarthSky Tonight—August 13, Moon and Venus, more Perseid meteors, and two star clusters

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The 2010 Perseid meteor shower has been in full swing for at least the past 24 hours, but you still have a last chance to see a good display of meteors before dawn August 14. In addition, as night falls this evening, you can see Venus near the waxing crescent moon in the western twilight sky. Today’s chart shows that lovely sky scene, which will set soon after darkness falls. You really have to be a night owl or an ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 12, Moon and Venus in

Earthsky Tonight—August 12, Moon and Venus in evening, 2010 Perseid meteors before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The 2010 Perseid meteor shower peaks tonight. Look late tonight and between midnight and dawn on Friday, August 13. As always, this forecast represents a best guess, not a certainty. Any clear night on the nights of August 11, 12 and 13 should be fine for watching the Perseid meteor shower! Be sure to go to a dark location and watch for an hour or more. The annual Perseid meteor shower ranks as one of the most prolific ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – August 11, How to find the

Earthsky Tonight – August 11, How to find the radiant point for Perseid meteors

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is the radiant point for the famous Perseid meteor shower. The 2010 Perseid meteors are peaking over the next few days. As always, you will see the most meteors between midnight and dawn. The morning of August 12 should be good. The morning of August 13 might be best for watching meteors. You might see meteors on the morning of August 14 as well, although the Perseids do tend to fall off rapidly after their ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 4, Cassiopeia the Queen on

Earthsky Tonight—August 4, Cassiopeia the Queen on summer evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org One of the most recognizable constellations is Cassiopeia the Queen, which now can be found in the northeastern sky a couple of hours after the sun goes down. This constellation has the distinct shape of a W, or M, depending on your perspective. Cassiopeia is associated with a queen of Ethiopia. She is sometimes called the Lady of the Chair. Queen Cassiopeia was said to have offended the sea nymphs, or Nereids, by ... Full Story

Page 1 of 212