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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘planet’

Sky Tonight—January 7, Venus farthest west of sun in

Sky Tonight—January 7, Venus farthest west of sun in Earth’s sky tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The most brilliant of all the planets, Venus, reaches its farthest point west of the sun in Earth’s sky on January 8, 2011. Astronomers call this a “greatest elongation” of Venus. At such times, Venus shines as the brilliant morning ’star’ in the east before sunrise. At its greatest morning elongation, Venus typically rises 3 hours or more before sunrise. Because the orbit of Venus lies inside ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 1, Moon and Mercury below Venus

Sky Tonight—January 1, Moon and Mercury below Venus before dawn tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you rise shortly before sunup tomorrow (Sunday, January 2), you might catch the waning crescent moon and elusive planet Mercury below brilliant Venus. Look in the direction of the sunrise – but an hour or more before the sun comes up. Looking for a sky almanac? EarthSky recommends You will need a clear view of the sky, because any obstructions such as mountains or trees will hide the moon and ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—December 29, Moon and Venus before dawn

Sky Tonight—December 29, Moon and Venus before dawn tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you look in the eastern predawn sky in the coming mornings, you will find the moon and planet Venus close together. They will be a beautiful sight tomorrow morning, shining nearly side by side. Venus is easy. It is the brightest object there other than the sun and moon. However, Mercury –the most elusive planet – is also up before dawn, closer to the horizon. Now here is a challenge. Did you see ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—December 16, Jupiter at eastern

EarthSky Tonight—December 16, Jupiter at eastern quadrature

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you could look down on the solar system plane from outer space today, you would see that the sun, Earth and Jupiter form a 90-degree angle. Astronomers will say that Jupiter is at eastern quadrature – or 90 degrees east of the sun – today. Geometric markers such as these, for planets and moons in our solar system, are more than just academic. They indicate where you can find these bodies in our sky ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—December 6, Winter Circle up by

EarthSky Tonight—December 6, Winter Circle up by late evening

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You will have to stay up until 9 or 10 p.m. tonight to see the exceptionally brilliant and huge Winter Circle filling up the eastern portion of sky. This famous sky pattern is not a constellation. It is an asterism: a noticeable pattern on the sky’s dome. In this case, the pattern is made of the brightest stars of winter, in many different constellations. From a dark sky, you will see the Milky Way’s ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 29, catch Mercury after sunset

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 29, catch Mercury after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You might be able to find the most elusive planet – Mercury – low in the southwest sky at evening dusk for this entire next week. This is the best evening apparition of this planet until March 2011. Even so, you will need an unobstructed southwest horizon and a clear sky – and possibly binoculars – to catch Mercury after the sun goes down. Mercury is hard to spot, not because it is dim, but ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 25, Find the Water Jar of

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 25, Find the Water Jar of Aquarius to the west of Jupiter

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Will you spot the Water Jar in the constellation Aquarius to the west (right) of the blazing planet Jupiter tonight? You are only likely to see the Y-shaped Water Jar and the stars of Aquarius if you have access to a dark sky. From downtown in a major city, you have a good chance of spotting Jupiter at nightfall and early evening, but that might be about it. Look for Jupiter to blaze in the southern sky at ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 24,Venus getting brighter in

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 24,Venus getting brighter in the predawn sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The planet Venus – the most brilliant celestial object after the sun and moon – is getting brighter day by day in the November predawn sky. This dazzling world was in our evening sky earlier this year. However, it recently passed between earth and the sun, so that it now rises about 3 hours before sunrise as seen from mid-northern latitudes. Moreover, at middle latitudes south of the equator, Venus ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 18, Moon and Jupiter tonight,

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 18, Moon and Jupiter tonight, Venus rises before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The moon and solar system’s largest planet, Jupiter, shine from dusk until well after midnight tonight. They will be very noticeable as the brightest objects in the night sky. After Jupiter and the waxing gibbous moon set in the west before Friday dawn tomorrow, look for the blazing planet Venus to rise in the east before dawn. The little star near it is Spica in the constellation VIrgo. The planet ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 16, Leonid meteors peak before

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 16, Leonid meteors peak before dawn November 17 and 18

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Here is the radiant point for the Leonid meteor shower. The 2010 Leonid meteor shower is expected to peak before dawn on Wednesday, November 17, or Thursday, November 18. If you have a dark sky – far from city lights – you might see as many as 10 to 15 meteors per hour at the shower’s peak. The best time to watch will be after the moon sets in the wee hours before dawn. Many ask about the radiant ... Full Story

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