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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Pleiades’

Sky Tonight—April 7, Waxing crescent moon in front

Sky Tonight—April 7, Waxing crescent moon in front of Taurus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Look in the west tonight after dark to see the waxing crescent moon in front of the constellation Taurus the Bull. Tonight’s moon presents a great jumping-off spot to find your way around Taurus. The star glaring to the left or upper left of the moon is Aldebaran, Taurus’s brightest star. Aldebaran, the ruddy eye of the Bull, is a red giant star and in the autumn of its years. The other bright light above the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 6, Pleiades cluster above crescent

Sky Tonight—April 6, Pleiades cluster above crescent moon

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Look westward at nightfall to see the Pleiades star cluster above tonight’s smiling lunar crescent. As seen from middle and far northern latitudes, the moon and Pleiades stay out well past dark tonight. For an extra treat, note the soft glow of earthshine on the moon’s dark (nighttime) side with the unaided eye or binoculars. When can you see earthshine on a crescent moon? Top tips for using ordinary ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 10, Moon shines close to Pleiades

Sky Tonight—March 10, Moon shines close to Pleiades star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The waxing crescent moon shines in the vicinity of the Pleiades star cluster tonight. On the other hand, if you live in the eastern part of the globe –Asia, Indonesia, Australia, or New Zealand – you will see the moon closer to the Pleiades tomorrow night. On a dark night, most people see the Pleiades cluster as a tiny dipper-shaped formation made of six little starlets. That lost seventh star – the missing ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 9, Moon between Pleiades and

Sky Tonight—March 9, Moon between Pleiades and Ram’s Head

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org To see Jupiter in March 2011, look west soon after sunset Just after sunset tonight you will spot the crescent moon above the western horizon. The moon floats between the faint head stars of the constellation Aries and the mythic sisters in the constellation Taurus known as the Pleiades. The moon is five days past new so it still appears to us as a waxing crescent moon. The best place to tour the moon with your ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 11, Waxing gibbous moon near

Sky Tonight—February 11, Waxing gibbous moon near Pleiades

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon shines close to the Pleiades star cluster tonight. This cluster is also called the Seven Sisters. Because of the moonlit glare, you might need binoculars to see the dipper-shaped Pleiades cluster. As seen from North America, the Pleiades sit to the west (right) of tonight’s moon. As seen from mid-northern latitudes in Europe and Asia, the Pleiades sit to the moon’s east (or left). ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 15, Moon near Aldebaran and the

Sky Tonight—January 15, Moon near Aldebaran and the Pleiades

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright star on January evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter We are displaying a larger swath of sky than we usually do on tonight’s chart. That is because we are showing you how to star-hop from the three stars of Orion’s Belt to the star Aldebaran and the Pleiades star cluster. Aldebaran and the Pleiades cluster reside within the constellation Taurus the Bull. However, you will not need Orion’s Belt to ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 14, Moon and Pleiades – or

Sky Tonight—January 14, Moon and Pleiades – or Seven Sisters

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon and the Pleiades star cluster are found high in the southern sky at early evening. Although the moonlit glare may make it difficult to see this tiny, dipper-shape cluster of starlets tonight, be sure to check out the Pleiades on a dark, moonless night. The moon will leave the evening sky during the last week of January 2011, staging the Pleiades in a dark starry sky. Then, you can use ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—December 18, Moon glides by

EarthSky Tonight—December 18, Moon glides by Pleiades cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight, moving eastward as it always does in orbit around Earth, the moon will pass by the famous Pleiades star cluster. Our sky chart shows you what the moon and the Pleiades cluster might look like through binoculars this early evening. Notice that the Pleiades has a dipper shape. Total lunar eclipse on December 20 or 21, depending on time zone Early stargazers sometimes described the Pleiades as a ’swarm of ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 23, Northern Crown shines

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 23,  Northern Crown shines after dusk and before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org At nightfall and early evening, the bowl-shaped constellation Corona Borealis – the Northern Crown – shines to the lower right of the star Vega, close to your western horizon. Can you spot brilliant Vega shining rather high in the western sky at nightfall? It can guide you to the Northern Crown. You will need a dark sky to see the Northern Crown, which is a glittery semicircle of stars. See the pattern of ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 31, Moon and Pleiades from

EarthSky Tonight—August 31, Moon and Pleiades from midnight to dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The moon is not quite yet at its last quarter phase as it and the Pleiades star cluster rise over your east-northeast horizon around midnight tonight. The Pleiades cluster follows the slightly waning gibbous moon upward during the morning hours after midnight on Wednesday. The two luminaries shine high in the southeast as morning dawn starts to color the sky. As seen from Madagascar, the Mauritius Islands to the east of ... Full Story

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