December 2014
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Procyon’

Sky Tonight—March 14, Moon and Gemini stars high in

Sky Tonight—March 14, Moon and Gemini stars high in south

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org This evening, as seen from the mid-northern latitudes, the waxing gibbous moon and the Gemini stars Castor and Pollux shine way up high in the southern sky. Castor and Pollux, the constellation Gemini the Twins’ two brightest stars, are seen above the moon. Procyon appears below the moon. Procyon is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Minor (the Lesser Dog). Once every month, the moon passes ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 13, Moon shines in front of Winter

Sky Tonight—March 13, Moon shines in front of Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org As seen tonight from all over the world, the moon passes right in front of the great big loop of stars known to northern hemisphere residents as the Winter Circle or the Winter Hexagon. This huge star formation makes even the constellation Orion the Hunter look small. Orion sits in the southwest (lower right) corner of the Winter Circle. The Winter Circle is an asterism – a group of stars that is NOT a ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 13, Moon points the way to

Sky Tonight—February 13, Moon points the way to Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s waxing gibbous moon resides inside the Winter Circle – an incredibly large star configuration made of six brilliant winter stars. Be sure to notice the variety in the colors of these stars. The Winter Circle – sometimes called the Winter Hexagon – is not one of the 88 recognized constellations. Rather, it is an asterism – a pattern of stars that is easy to recognize. Our sky chart ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 6, Use bright stars to find

Sky Tonight—January 6, Use bright stars to find faint Monoceros the Unicorn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You will need a very dark sky to see the constellation Monoceros the Unicorn  on these cold January nights. How can you find the Unicorn? Focus in on the bright stars Betelgeuse, Sirius and Procyon. They make a triangle, sometimes called the Winter Triangle. Within this triangle of stars, hidden in between the many bright and glittering stars and constellations visible at this time of year, there is a ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—December 6, Winter Circle up by

EarthSky Tonight—December 6, Winter Circle up by late evening

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You will have to stay up until 9 or 10 p.m. tonight to see the exceptionally brilliant and huge Winter Circle filling up the eastern portion of sky. This famous sky pattern is not a constellation. It is an asterism: a noticeable pattern on the sky’s dome. In this case, the pattern is made of the brightest stars of winter, in many different constellations. From a dark sky, you will see the Milky Way’s ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive cluster pair up in mid April

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org These mid-April evenings provide you with a golden opportunity to see the Beehive star cluster, the crown jewel of the constellation Cancer the Crab. The moon will be absent from the sky for the next several evenings, featuring dark nights for observing this deep-sky treasure. The Beehive is faintly visible to the unaided eye in a dark country sky. However, you really need binoculars to transform this hazy smudge of light ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 25, 2010: Moon and Mars

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 25, 2010: Moon and Mars close together

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon and planet Mars can be seen in the eastern sky at nightfall tonight. These two worlds climb highest in the sky in mid to late evening and set in the west tomorrow before the onset of dawn. You can see the moon and Mars close together on our sky’s dome for most of the night tonight. The moon and Mars aren’t really close together in space. They only appear to be close, because they ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 24, 2010: Moon near Mars,

Earthsky Tonight – Feb 24, 2010: Moon near Mars, Castor, Pollux

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The big and bright waxing gibbous moon erases many stars from the blackboard of night tonight. Nonetheless, the two brightest stars in the constellation Gemini the Twins – Castor and Pollux – should be able to withstand the moonlit glare. The moon is near with Castor and Pollux this evening. However, you can’t count on the moon to guide you to Castor and Pollux every night. Tomorrow, at this same time, you ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 5, 2010 Bright Mars and

Earthsky Tonight, February 5, 2010 Bright Mars and Beehive star cluster in same binocular field

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you’ve never seen the planet Mars – or haven’t seen it recently – now is the time to look. This reddish world – the world most like Earth in our solar system – shines more brilliantly this February than it will for the next several years. What’s more, Mars sits right in front of the constellation Cancer the Crab now. It shines only 3 degrees from a beautiful star cluster in the direction of ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, January 21, 2010: Identify the stars

Earthsky Tonight, January 21, 2010: Identify the stars of the Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart covers a wider area of sky than what we typically show. It’s in answer to a reader in Nashville, who wrote, I’ve heard mention of the Winter Circle of Stars. Could you list the stars in this circle? You will find these stars at this time of year by looking east-southeast in early-mid evening. Again, this is a large pattern and covers a wide area of sky, but as always it’s easiest to ... Full Story

Page 1 of 212