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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Regulus’

Sky Tonight—May 11, Moon brushes the belly of Leo

Sky Tonight—May 11, Moon brushes the belly of Leo

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The moon is waxing larger in the evening sky each night. The first quarter phase happened yesterday, and now it is a waxing gibbous moon. Tonight’s moon is near the star Regulus and brushing up against the belly of the constellation Leo the Lion throughout the evening. Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. It dots the backward question mark of stars dubbed the Sickle. The Sickle is ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our diagram shows the constellation Leo the Lion for about 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. tonight. At this time, the Lion will be due south and at his highest point in the sky. Two distinctive star patterns make the Lion easy to identify. Leo’s brightest star – the sparkling blue-white gem Regulus – dots a backward question mark of stars known as The Sickle. If you see a Lion in this pattern of stars, the Sickle outlines ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 13, Moon close to Regulus – a

Sky Tonight—April 13, Moon close to Regulus – a Royal Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight, the waxing gibbous moon shines close to Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Regulus is considered to be the Heart of the Lion in Leo. Regulus is also one of the four “Royal Stars” of ancient Persia. These Royal Stars mark the four quadrants of the heavens. They are Regulus, Antares, Fomalhaut, and Aldebaran. Regulus: Heart of the Lion Four to five thousand years ago, the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 12, Use moon to locate Cancer the

Sky Tonight—April 12, Use moon to locate Cancer the Crab

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The moon can guide you to Cancer the Crab tonight – if you are patient. You have probably heard of the constellation Cancer, but there is a good chance you have never seen it. As constellations go, Cancer the Crab is probably the most famous constellation that the fewest people can actually identify in the night sky. Its primary competitors in the famous-but-not-recognizable category are probably Aries the Ram ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 18, Watch for full moon, planet

Sky Tonight—March 18, Watch for full moon, planet Saturn, high tides this weekend

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org   There is a lot going on in the sky on the weekend of March 18-20, 2011. The moon will be near a bright planet (Saturn) and some bright stars (Regulus and Spica). Plus there will be an especially close full moon – which some are now calling a supermoon – which might mean higher-than-usual tides, especially if the weather gets stormy along coastlines. What is true – and false – about the March 19 ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 18, Moon rises with Leo the

Sky Tonight—February 18, Moon rises with Leo the Lion, harbinger of spring

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org About two hours after sunset on February 18, look for the waning gibbous moon and the constellation Leo the Lion shining side by side over the eastern horizon. The fainter stars of Leo might be hard to make out in the lunar glare tonight, but you should be able to spot Regulus, Leo’s brightest star, and one of the brightest stars in our night sky. Tomorrow, the moon will rise more than an hour later than it does ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 16, Bright moon puts Cancer in

Sky Tonight—February 16, Bright moon puts Cancer in spotlight

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The almost-full waxing gibbous moon puts the constellation Cancer in the spotlight – but out of view – this Wednesday night. Demure Cancer the Crab is the faintest constellation of the Zodiac. You can see it only on dark, moonless nights. Understanding moon phases The starry sky is like a great big connect-the-dots book, enabling stargazers to star-hop from brighter stars to more obscure nighttime treasures. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight— December 24, Moon approaching Regulus

Sky Tonight— December 24, Moon approaching Regulus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright object in south on December evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter If you are out late on this Friday evening, look toward the east to see the moon near the star known as the Lion’s Heart. This is Regulus, brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Although our sky chart is designed for mid-temperate North American latitudes, the moon and Regulus can be seen late tonight from all around the world. ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 27, Saturn, Mars, Venus –

Earthsky Tonight—July 27, Saturn, Mars, Venus – close pairing of Regulus and Mercury

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The planets Saturn, Mars and Venus are still in the west after sunset, to the delight of stargazers across the globe. In addition, the planet Mercury –our solar system’s innermost world – teams up with Regulus around now in the same part of the sky. Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Tonight, Mercury and Regulus form the year’s closest pairing of a planet with a first-magnitude star. Look for ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 9, 2010: Venus and Regulus in

Earthsky Tonight—July 9, 2010: Venus and Regulus in conjunction

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The dazzling planet Venus and the star Regulus are in conjunction at 9 p.m. Central Daylight Time this evening. That means they are north and south of one another on the sky’s dome, with a small gap separating the two. This evening, Venus and Regulus shine about the same distance apart as the width of your little finger, held at arm’s length. Although Regulus is a very bright star, it pales next to Venus, which is the ... Full Story

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