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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Rigel’

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 27, Orion the Hunter rises in

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 27, Orion the Hunter rises in the east at mid-evening

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Orion the Mighty Hunter – perhaps the easiest to identify of all constellations – rises at mid-evening in late November and early December. Depending on where you live, Orion will climb over your eastern horizon by around 8 to 9 p.m. tonight. Orion appears to be lying on his side when he first ascends into our eastern sky. Orion’s Belt of three moderately-bright stars juts more or less straight ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 10, 2010: You need a dark

Earthsky Tonight, February 10, 2010: You need a dark sky to see Eridanus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is one of the sky’s most graceful and beautiful constellations, if you have access to a very dark sky. You won’t see this one from the city, or even the suburbs. Eridanus the River begins near the star Rigel in the constellation Orion. It wells up in a great loop before ambling back down toward the southern horizon. Eridanus is one of the longest and faintest constellations. It’s variously said ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 4, 2010: Blue-white Rigel

Earthsky Tonight, February 4, 2010: Blue-white Rigel is at the foot of Orion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The three sparkling blue-white stars of Orion’s Belt are easy to spot. As viewed from this hemisphere, this compact line of stars can be found in the southern sky at nightfall. Look in the south to southwestern sky any evening around now. Chances are the pattern you’ll pick out Orion! You may note that Orion’s two brightest stars – Betelgeuse and Rigel – lodge at an equal distance above and below ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, February 3, 2010: Somber red

Earthsky Tonight, February 3, 2010: Somber red Betelgeuse shines in the shoulder of Orion

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At nightfall and early evening, people at mid-northern latitudes see the famous Belt of Orion – three stars in a short, straight row – about halfway between the southern horizon and straight overhead. Later at night, you will find Orion in the southwest. Above Orion’s Belt, you will find one of the sky’s most famous stars, ruddy-hued Betelgeuse. Kids especially like Betelgeuse, because its name sounds so much ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, January 21, 2010: Identify the stars

Earthsky Tonight, January 21, 2010: Identify the stars of the Winter Circle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart covers a wider area of sky than what we typically show. It’s in answer to a reader in Nashville, who wrote, I’ve heard mention of the Winter Circle of Stars. Could you list the stars in this circle? You will find these stars at this time of year by looking east-southeast in early-mid evening. Again, this is a large pattern and covers a wide area of sky, but as always it’s easiest to ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight, January 20, 2010: Achernar, the end

Earthsky Tonight, January 20, 2010: Achernar, the end of the River

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Today’s chart is almost just like the January 16 chart. But today we’ve changed our observing location. Normally, our charts are set for the geographical center of the continental U.S. – say, somewhere in Kansas. Today’s chart is set to the extreme southern U.S. It’s as if we’re gazing at stars from the southernmost part of the country . . . maybe along the Texas/Mexico border, or from the Florida ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight: January 16, 2010 – See a river

Earthsky Tonight: January 16, 2010 – See a river of stars called Eridanus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here’s a constellation for you if you have access to a very dark sky. You won’t see this one from the city, or even the suburbs. Eridanus the River begins near the star Rigel in the constellation Orion the Hunter – and wells up in a great loop before ambling back down toward the southern horizon. Eridanus is one of the longest and faintest constellations. It’s variously said to represent the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Jan 08 2010 Orion the Hunter

Earthsky Tonight – Jan 08 2010 Orion the Hunter is easy to spot

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The constellation Orion the Hunter is probably the easiest to pick out of all the constellations in the winter sky. It’s identifiable by Orion’s Belt, three medium-bright stars in a short, straight row at the mid-section of the Hunter. See these stars? They are easy to spot on the sky’s dome. You’ll find Orion shining high in the south on January evenings. If you pick out any noticeable pattern in ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Dec 27 2009, Bellatrix

Earthsky Tonight – Dec 27 2009, Bellatrix – Orion’s third brightest – means ‘Female Warrior’

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The constellation Orion takes center stage this month and rightly so. With an inordinate number of bright stars, it is one of the most prominent constellations in the sky. Look for Orion in the east-southeastern sky from around 6 to 7 p.m. A while ago, we talked about Orion’s two brightest stars, but the third-brightest star in Orion, Bellatrix, is often overlooked. According to Richard Hinckley Allen’s ... Full Story

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