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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Sky Tonight’

Sky Tonight—January 18, Moon near Gemini stars

Sky Tonight—January 18, Moon near Gemini stars Castor and Pollux

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at0 www.EarthSky.org The moon will look full tonight as it shines close to the constellation Gemini’s brightest stars, Castor and Pollux. The moon will not actually be astronomically full – or most opposite the sun – until tomorrow, on Wednesday, January 19. Although we draw in the stick figure of the Gemini Twins on tonight’s chart, you will not see much of Gemini in the moonlight except for Castor and Pollux. By the last ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 17, Sun moves toward star Vega

Sky Tonight—January 17, Sun moves toward star Vega in journey around galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org An Australia visitor wrote, I seek to find out what speed our sun is traveling at and also how many years does it take to circumnavigate the galaxy? Our Milky Way galaxy is a collection of several hundred billion stars. It has an estimated diameter of 100,000 light-years. Our sun does indeed circumnavigate the Milky Way galaxy. In space, everything moves. There are various estimates for the speed the sun travels ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 16, Cassiopeia and Big Dipper on

Sky Tonight—January 16, Cassiopeia and Big Dipper on opposite sides of North Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright star on January evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter The northern sky’s two most prominent sky patterns – the constellation Cassiopeia the Queen and the Big Dipper – both circle around Polaris, the North Star, once a day. They are opposite each other – one on either side of the North Star. The constellation Cassiopeia the Queen is easy to recognize in the northern sky, either in the evening or before ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 15, Moon near Aldebaran and the

Sky Tonight—January 15, Moon near Aldebaran and the Pleiades

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright star on January evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter We are displaying a larger swath of sky than we usually do on tonight’s chart. That is because we are showing you how to star-hop from the three stars of Orion’s Belt to the star Aldebaran and the Pleiades star cluster. Aldebaran and the Pleiades cluster reside within the constellation Taurus the Bull. However, you will not need Orion’s Belt to ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 14, Moon and Pleiades – or

Sky Tonight—January 14, Moon and Pleiades – or Seven Sisters

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The waxing gibbous moon and the Pleiades star cluster are found high in the southern sky at early evening. Although the moonlit glare may make it difficult to see this tiny, dipper-shape cluster of starlets tonight, be sure to check out the Pleiades on a dark, moonless night. The moon will leave the evening sky during the last week of January 2011, staging the Pleiades in a dark starry sky. Then, you can use ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 13, Moon in front of Aries the

Sky Tonight—January 13, Moon in front of Aries the Ram

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight, the waxing gibbous moon shines in front of the constellation Aries the Ram. As seen from mid-northern latitudes at nightfall and early evening, you’ll find the moon high in your southern sky, and the three stars outlining the head of the Ram shining to the right or upper right of the moon. These Aries’ stars are Hamal, Sheratan and Mesarthim. Hamal is the brightest of these three stars, though none ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 12, Moon and stars of Aries

Sky Tonight—January 12, Moon and stars of Aries point to Phantom galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Practiced stargazers sometimes use three stars of the constellation Aries the Ram to find an elusive galaxy – M74 – also known as the Phantom galaxy. As seen from the world this evening, the first quarter moon shines in front of the constellation Pisces the Fishes, not far at the Aries/Pisces border. The three stars mentioned above are to the moon’s upper left tonight. They depict the head of Aries the Ram. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 11,Two stars flag sun’s path

Sky Tonight—January 11,Two stars flag sun’s path through Milky Way

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You can use the brilliant star Sirius – and the star Vega – to imagine the direction our sun and solar system are traveling through space. The sun in its orbit is traveling away from Sirus and toward the star Vega. Although we could not fit them both on one chart, Vega shines over your northwestern horizon, opposite Sirius, at nightfall at this time of year. If you stand outside in early evening with your back ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Moon and Jupiter still close

Sky Tonight—Moon and Jupiter still close

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the waxing crescent moon and the blazing planet Jupiter as viewed from North America. However, no matter where you live, it should be a piece of cake to find Jupiter this evening. Look for the very brilliant star-like object near tonight’s moon, and that will be Jupiter. For us in North America, the moon will shine at roughly the same distance from Jupiter tonight that it did yesterday. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 9, Watch moon and Jupiter

Sky Tonight—January 9, Watch moon and Jupiter

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The first two celestial objects to pop out at evening dusk are the waxing crescent moon and the dazzling planet Jupiter. The moon and Jupiter rank as the brightest and second brightest heavenly bodies in the evening sky, respectively. The position of the moon and Jupiter at evening dusk depends on where you live worldwide. Way up north – like in Alaska – the moon and Jupiter will appear rather low in southern ... Full Story

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