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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Sky Tonight’

April 4, Catch a young moon on Monday

April 4, Catch a young moon on Monday

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you live in North America, Europe or far western Asia, you might be able to catch an exceedingly young lunar crescent after sunset on April 4, 2011, which is the day after new moon. All other things being equal, it’ll be hardest to spot the young moon in Asia and easiest to spot in North America. Springtime is the best time to catch a young evening crescent, because that’s when the waxing crescent ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 3, Saturn closest, brightest,

Sky Tonight—April 3, Saturn closest, brightest, opposite the sun

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The best time of 2011 to see Saturn is here. Planet Earth flies between the sun and Saturn tonight, according to U.S. clocks. Our fast movement in orbit brings us between Saturn and the sun every year, to an event called opposition by astronomers. In other words, Saturn is now opposite the sun in Earth’s sky. At opposition, Saturn rises in the east at sunset and sets in the west at sunrise. So Saturn is ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 2, Follow the arc to Arcturus

Sky Tonight—April 2, Follow the arc to Arcturus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Now is a perfect time to look outside in the evening and learn a playful phrase useful to skywatchers. Scouts learn it. Grandparents teach it to kids. It was one of the first sky tools I learned to use in astronomy. The phrase is: follow the arc to Arcturus. First locate the Big Dipper asterism in the northeastern sky in mid-evening, maybe around 9 p.m. Can’t find the Big Dipper? Look ahead to our ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 1, Use Big Dipper to find Polaris

Sky Tonight—April 1, Use Big Dipper to find Polaris and Little Dipper

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Here is the view northward on April evenings. At present the Big Dipper is high in the north. Notice the two outer stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper. These two stars – called Duhbe and Merak – always point to Polaris, the North Star. Polaris is special because it always stays in the same spot in the northern sky. It is the star around which the entire northern sky appears to turn. That is because ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 31, Moon and Venus side by side

Sky Tonight—March 31, Moon and Venus side by side before sunrise April 1

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the thin waning crescent moon and the planet Venus for about an hour before sunrise tomorrow (Friday, April 1, 2011), as seen from middle latitudes in North America. Mid-northern latitudes all around the world will see the moon and Venus shining more or less side by side as well. You will want an unobstructed horizon in the direction of sunrise, because the moon and Venus will be sitting ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 30, Moon very close to Venus at

Sky Tonight—March 30, Moon very close to Venus at dawn March 31

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Did you see the waning crescent moon and the blazing planet Venus today (Wednesday, March 30, 2011), before sunrise? At morning dawn tomorrow (Thursday, March 31) a thinner lunar crescent will pair up with Venus, which is sometimes called the “morning star.” As seen from the northern hemisphere, the moon and Venus will sit low in the east at dawn. Therefore, you will need an unobstructed view eastward ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 29, Moon and Venus low in east at

Sky Tonight—March 29, Moon and Venus low in east at dawn tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org As seen from mid-northern latitudes on Wednesday, March 30, the waning crescent moon and the blazing planet Venus will be sitting low over the eastern horizon, starting around an hour before sunrise. Any obstructions – such as trees or houses – might block your view of Venus. The moon will be easier to spot because it will be higher up in the sky. Venus is the third brightest celestial body to light ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 28, Tangle of stars in

Sky Tonight—March 28, Tangle of stars in Berenice’s Hair

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org What we are about to describe requires a dark sky to be seen: a faraway cluster of stars known as Coma Berenices. How can you spot it? One way is to use the famous constellation Leo the Lion, now in the east each evening. Leo is relatively easy to see. The front part of the Lion looks like a backwards question mark, and the back part is a little triangle, which includes the star Denebola, marked on today’s ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 27, Use the Big Dipper to locate

Sky Tonight—March 27, Use the Big Dipper to locate the Hunting Dogs

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You can easily locate the Big Dipper in the northeast sky on these early springtime evenings. The Big Dipper is part of the constellation Ursa Major, the Greater Bear. If you can find the Big Dipper, you can also find two Hunting Dogs seen by the ancient stargazers to be nipping at the Bear’s heels. The Hunting Dogs are a separate constellation: tiny Canes Venatici. You will need a dark sky to see these ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 26, Is Sirius the most luminous

Sky Tonight—March 26, Is Sirius the most luminous star in the sky?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Look southward at dusk and nightfall, and you can’t miss Sirius, the brightest star in the nighttime sky. Mia asks, “Isn’t there a brighter star in absolute magnitude which appears dimmer because of its distance?” Yes, Mia, you are right. Sirius, in the constellation Canis Major (the Greater Dog), looks extraordinarily bright in Earth’s sky because it is only 8.6 light-years away. Many stars on ... Full Story

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