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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Summer Triangle’

Sky Tonight—March 8, The Summer Triangle, a signpost

Sky Tonight—March 8, The Summer Triangle, a signpost for all seasons

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org To see Jupiter in March 2011, look west soon after sunset As seen from our northern temperate latitudes, the three brilliant stars of the Summer Triangle – Vega, Deneb and Altair – are out for at least part of the night every night of the year. Presently, the Summer Triangle shines in the eastern sky at and before dawn. Like the Big Dipper, the Summer Triangle is an asterism – a pattern of stars ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 28, Summer Triangle in west on

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 28, Summer Triangle in west on fall and winter evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The Summer Triangle – the signature star formation of summer – is made up of the three brilliant stars Vega, Deneb and Altair. Although December is just around the corner, the Summer Triangle still lights up these autumn evenings. What’s more, the Summer Triangle will continue to shine after dark throughout December and January. Look for it at early evening, fairly high in your western sky. In ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—October 14, Find constellations of

EarthSky Tonight—October 14,  Find constellations of the Zodiac on October evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Today’s sky chart shows the constellations of the Zodiac that are up after nightfall on these October evenings. We got this question: "I’m having a difficult time being able to recognize the constellations of the Zodiac . . . do you have any advice?" Yes . . . we can recommend a few things. First, the zodiacal constellations are the backdrop for the pathway of the sun around our sky each year, and of the moon for ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 4, Use Summer Triangle to

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 4,  Use Summer Triangle to find plane of Milky Way galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At this time of year, you can use the Summer Triangle – and the constellation Cygnus the Swan – to locate the plane of our Milky Way galaxy. The three brilliant stars that make up the Summer Triangle shine way up high in the October evening sky. I suggest viewing the scene from the comfort of a reclining lawn chair, with your feet pointing southward. As seen from mid-northern latitudes, the stars Deneb and Vega hang ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 27, Summer Triangle high

EarthSky Tonight—September 27,  Summer Triangle high overhead on autumn evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Even as autumn is beginning, we still have several months to watch the large asterism known as the Summer Triangle. This huge star pattern looms from south to overhead in the autumn evening sky. The Summer Triangle consists of three bright stars in three separate constellations. The stars are Vega in the constellation Lyra, Deneb in the constellation Cygnus, and Altair in the constellation Aquila. Today’s chart has ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 22, Almost full moon lights

EarthSky Tonight—August 22, Almost full moon lights up Capricornus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We draw in the arrowhead-shape figure of the constellation Capricornus by the moon on tonight’s chart. However, you are not likely to see this star pattern tonight because of the overwhelming glare of the full-looking waxing gibbous moon. When the moon drops out of the evening sky by the end of the month, you will be able to see this loop of stars in a dark sky. The signpost of the summer skies – the Summer ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 21, Summer Triangle high

EarthSky Tonight—August 21,  Summer Triangle high overhead on summer evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the Summer Triangle asterism as it appears at late evening. As seen from mid-northern latitudes, Vega – the Summer Triangle’s brightest star – shines high overhead around 10:00 p.m. daylight saving time (9:00 p.m. standard time) this evening. Altair resides to the lower left (southeast) of Vega, and Deneb lies to Vega’s left (east). As the stars drift westward during the night, Deneb will swing ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 8, Look overhead to see the

Earthsky Tonight—August 8, Look overhead to see the summer Milky Way

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The moon will be new tomorrow and then in a waxing crescent phase in the west after sunset in the next few days. That means that, over the coming week, the moon will set soon after sunset and be mostly absent from the evening sky. A moonless sky means this is a good time to get out into the country for a look at the summer Milky Way: the edgewise view into our own galaxy. Here is the view if you are standing facing east ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 29, Summer Triangle and the

Earthsky Tonight—July 29, Summer Triangle and the smallest constellations

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org I pointed out the Summer Triangle earlier this month. This famous pattern of stars is now at its best in the night sky. The Summer Triangle consists of three bright stars – Vega, Deneb and Altair – in three separate constellations. If you can find the Summer Triangle, you can use it to locate three of the sky’s smallest constellations: Vulpecula the Fox, Delphinus the Dolphin and Sagitta the Arrow. EarthSky’s ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 19, Summer Triangle: Altair

Earthsky Tonight—July 19, Summer Triangle: Altair and Aquila the Eagle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the east after dark, near the horizon, Altair, the brightest star in the constellation Aquila, the Eagle, springs into view. This is the bottom star of the Summer Triangle. The Great Rift of the Summer Milky Way passes through the Summer Triangle, between the stars Vega and Altair. Thought the Great Rift and the Milky Way will be hard to see tonight because of the waxing gibbous moon. In dark skies in late July and the ... Full Story

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