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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Monday, November 24, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Vega’

Earthsky Tonight—May 29: Tonight’s moon near

Earthsky Tonight—May 29: Tonight’s moon near Teapot asterism

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org At middle latitudes in North America, the waning gibbous moon rises into the southeast sky about 2 hours after sunset. The full moon only happened a few days ago, so the moon tonight will look very bright as it shines from mid-evening until dawn. Tonight’s moon beams in front of the constellation Sagittarius the Archer. By around midnight, the Sagittarian Teapot will climb above the southeast horizon, with the moon ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—May 28: Look for Vega in the

Earthsky Tonight—May 28:  Look for Vega in the northeast in springtime

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is the star Vega, the fifth brightest star in the sky. You will find this beautiful bluish star by looking northeastward in mid-evening. It is so bright that you can notice it, even when no other stars are visible. Vega is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra the Harp. To see the shape of the entire Harp, check out this chart. Vega is a lovely star to come to know. When I was first learning the night sky, ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—May 13, 2010: M13, the Great

Earthsky Tonight—May 13, 2010: M13, the Great Cluster in Hercules

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Hercules above the star Vega. Today’s closer view can help you identify the most famous deep-sky object within this constellation. It is a globular star cluster known as M13. Today’s chart shows the location of M13. It is about a third of the distance along a line between the stars Eta and Zeta Hercules. We are not showing you what the cluster looks like on this chart – and in the sky, you’ll see it differently, ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—May 12, 2010 The constellation

Earthsky Tonight—May 12, 2010 The constellation Hercules and The Keystone

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Hercules the Hero is not the easiest constellation to identify. You will need a dark sky to see this mighty star figure. However, if you can see Vega – a prominent blue-white star in the northeast in the evening now – you might spot Hercules nearby. Still can’t see it? Look back at this chart to see Hercules with respect to both Vega and another star, Arcturus. The most noticeable part of Hercules is an ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—May 06, Milky Way encircles the

Earthsky Tonight—May 06, Milky Way encircles the horizon on May evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Where is the Milky Way these days? That faint luminous band of stars crossing the dome of sky is nowhere to be seen on May evenings. Why? The disk of our Milky Way is shaped like a pancake. On May evenings, the plane of the pancake-shaped galactic disk coincides with the plane of the horizon. Because the Milky Way disk sits along the horizon in every direction, the Milky Way doesn’t appear in the sky on May ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 22, Lyrid meteors may still

Earthsky Tonight — April 22, Lyrid meteors may still be flying before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is the constellation Lyra again – a closer look than on Tuesday. This constellation rises over your north-northeastern horizon around 10 to 11 p.m. tonight and marks the radiant point of the Lyrid meteor shower. The Lyrids were predicted to put forth the most meteors before dawn this morning. However, meteor showers are hard to pin down, so you may see as many or more meteors in the wee hours before dawn tomorrow. You ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight —April 20, Vega marks radiant point

Earthsky Tonight —April 20, Vega marks radiant point of April’s Lyrid meteor shower

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The 2010 Lyrid meteor shower is now picking up steam. This shower is expected to produce the most meteors in the dark hours before dawn on Thursday, April 22. The evening before, on April 21, Mars will be near the moon. The approximate direction of the radiant point for the Lyrid meteors is toward Vega, the heaven’s 5th brightest star and the brightest light in the constellation Lyra. The radiant point for the meteors ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — March 8, 2010: The Summer

Earthsky Tonight — March 8, 2010: The Summer Triangle, a signpost for all seasons

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org As seen from our northern temperate latitudes, the three brilliant stars of the Summer Triangle – Vega, Deneb and Altair – are out for at least part of the night every night of the year. Presently, the Summer Triangle shines in the eastern sky at and before dawn. Like the Big Dipper, the Summer Triangle is an asterism – a pattern of stars that is not one of the officially recognized 88 constellations. To gauge the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Jan 4, 2010: Sun moves toward

Earthsky Tonight – Jan 4, 2010: Sun moves toward star Vega

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org An Australia visitor wrote, I seek to find out what speed our sun is traveling at and also how many years does it take to circumnavigate the galaxy? Our Milky Way galaxy is a collection of several hundred billion stars. It has an estimated diameter of 100,000 light-years. Our sun does indeed circumnavigate the Milky Way galaxy. In space, everything moves. There are various estimates for the speed ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – Dec 23 2009 Star-hop to

Earthsky Tonight – Dec 23 2009 Star-hop to Mercury from the Summer Triangle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The first three stars to pop out into your western sky after sunset are Vega, Altair and Deneb. These brilliant stars make up the huge asterism known as the Summer Triangle. An asterism is a star formation that is not an officially recognized constellation. Don’t mistake the planet Jupiter (outside of our sky chart) for a Summer Triangle star. Jupiter beams in the southwestern sky, to the left of the Summer ... Full Story

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