December 2014
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Venus’

EarthSky Tonight—September 10, Moon waxes as Venus

EarthSky Tonight—September 10,  Moon waxes as Venus wanes in September evening sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing crescent moon and the blazing planet Venus shine low in the west at dusk. Our chart shows the sky scene for about 45 minutes after sundown, with the moon barely above the horizon. If you miss the moon with Venus this evening, try again tomorrow. On Saturday, the lunar crescent will appear higher in the sky and will set later after sunset. Whenever the moon appears in the west at dusk and early evening, it is ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight September 2, Venus sets

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight   September 2,  Venus sets as Jupiter rises on September evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org All this month – during September 2010 – the queen planet Venus sets in the west as the king planet Jupiter rises in the east. Our chart shows the eastern sky at early evening for mid-northern latitudes, with Jupiter – the sky’s second brightest planet – shining to the lower right of the Great Square of Pegasus. Venus – the sky’s brightest planet – pops out in the west shortly after sunset. As dusk deepens, ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 1, Venus, Mars, Spica

EarthSky Tonight—September 1,  Venus, Mars, Spica meet in west after sunset early September

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The first few evenings of September 2010 present a celestial trio – the planets Venus and Mars, and the star Spica fitting within a circle that is smaller than 5 degrees in diameter. Because a typical binocular field spans about 5 degrees of sky, there is a good chance of seeing all three luminaries squeezing up together inside a single binocular field. All three should be bright enough to see with the unaided eye, if ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 29, Closest celestial trio

EarthSky Tonight—August 29, Closest celestial trio of 2010 in late August, early September

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In a few more days, Venus and Mars will team up with the star Spica to stage this year’s closest celestial trio – three heavenly bodies fitting within a circle smaller than 5 degrees in diameter. A typical binocular field covers about 5 degrees of sky, and you might catch all three snuggling within a single binocular field this early evening. As seen from North America, the threesome cozies up even more closely on ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 23, Venus points way to

EarthSky Tonight—August 23, Venus points way to fainter Mars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org How soon can you spot Venus above the western horizon as the sun sets? From the northern hemisphere, the ecliptic – the line in the sky that marks the path of the sun, as well as its attendant planets – makes a shallow angle with the horizon. The slant of the ecliptic is more perpendicular to the horizon in the southern hemisphere, making Venus stand tall during twilight. Shining at magnitude -4.4, Venus easily pierces ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 19, Venus’ greatest

EarthSky Tonight—August 19, Venus’ greatest evening elongation favors southern hemisphere

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Because the planet Venus circles the sun inside of Earth’s orbit, Venus can never appear opposite the sun in Earth’s sky – like the moon does at full moon. In fact, Venus cannot even get as far as 90 degrees from the sun – as the moon does at its first and last quarter phases. As seen from Earth, Venus stays closely tethered to the sun. These next few evenings, however, will find Venus at the end of its tether, at ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica,

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica, Venus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the west after sunset tonight, you will find Spica and the waxing crescent moon. The planets to the right of the moon are Mars, Venus and Saturn. Of those planets, Venus will be easiest to see because it is so bright. You might need binoculars for Mars and Saturn. Spica is known as a blue-white star. Can you detect its color in contrast to nearby stars? If not, try looking at Spica with binoculars. Spica isn’t ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 13, Moon and Venus, more

EarthSky Tonight—August 13, Moon and Venus, more Perseid meteors, and two star clusters

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The 2010 Perseid meteor shower has been in full swing for at least the past 24 hours, but you still have a last chance to see a good display of meteors before dawn August 14. In addition, as night falls this evening, you can see Venus near the waxing crescent moon in the western twilight sky. Today’s chart shows that lovely sky scene, which will set soon after darkness falls. You really have to be a night owl or an ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 1, Mercury, Venus, Mars,

Earthsky Tonight—August 1, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The western sky after evening twilight has hosted a trio of planets for the past several weeks. However, there is room for one more! Mercury, the closest planet to the sun, has been moving away from the solar glare to accompany Venus, Mars, and Saturn. Horizon-hugging Mercury does not stay visible long, however. Brilliant Venus is the easiest to spot at daylight wanes. Look for Mercury soon after sunset as the brightest ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 30, Mars and Saturn closest

Earthsky Tonight—July 30, Mars and Saturn closest for 2010

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The first “star” to pop out into the evening twilight is no star at all but the dazzling planet Venus. After sunset, look westward for the brightest point of light that you can find. That will be Venus, the most brilliant celestial body to bedeck the heavens after the sun and moon. EarthSky’s meteor shower guide for 2010 As dusk deepens into night, notice the visible pair of planets to the upper left of Venus: ... Full Story

Page 4 of 7« First...3456...Last »