August 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  
News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘waning crescent moon’

Sky Tonight—March 1, Moon still close to Venus

Sky Tonight—March 1, Moon still close to Venus before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The thin crescent moon still shines near Venus, the sky’s brightest planet, at morning dawn on Wednesday, March 2. However, you will need a level and unobstructed horizon to catch the moon and Venus low in your east-southeast sky. Look for them over the horizon about 75 to 60 minutes before sunup. Venus, the 2nd planet outward from the sun, orbits the sun one step inward from Earth. Because Venus’ ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 28, Moon and Venus closest together

Sky Tonight—Feb 28, Moon and Venus closest together on morning of March 1

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the waning crescent moon and the brightest planet Venus for about an hour before sunrise on March 1. We are showing mid-northern latitudes, like those in the U.S. As seen from the world’s eastern hemisphere – Europe, Africa, the Middle East, western Asia, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand – the moon and Venus pair up even more closely together than they do in the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 27, Moon and Venus in southeast

Sky Tonight—Feb 27, Moon and Venus in southeast before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If it is clear in the wee hours before sunrise on February 28, there is no way that you can miss the waning crescent moon and the dazzling planet Venus in the east or southeast sky. After all, the moon and Venus rank as the second- and third-brightest heavenly bodies, respectively, after the sun. From middle latitudes in the northern hemisphere, the moon and Venus will rise about 2 hours before the sun ... Full Story

Sky Tonight-Feb 26, Epsilon Aurigae, the

Sky Tonight-Feb 26, Epsilon Aurigae, the Charioteer’s distant and mysterious star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org At early evening, look up high for the brilliant star Capella, the brightest in the constellation Auriga the Charioteer. Close to Capella, note the prominent triangle of starlets called The Kids. Lighting up the apex of this triangle is the star Epsilon Aurigae (Almaaz), one of the most mysterious stars in all the heavens. More on Capella: Golden Goat Star Although Capella looks much brighter than ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 25, Scorpius the Scorpion’s

Sky Tonight—Feb 25, Scorpius the Scorpion’s stinger stars an early harbinger of spring

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Will you see the constellation Scorpius the Scorpion’s stinger stars below the waning crescent moon in the cold dawn tomorrow? You will need a clear, unobstructed view to the south to southeast to spot the stinger stars – Shaula and Lesath – flickering by the horizon. If you cannot spot these stars tomorrow, try again in later winter. The stars at the end of the Scorpion’s tail are also known ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 1, For those at southerly

Sky Tonight—February 1, For those at southerly latitudes, Canopus!

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Here is a star that northern stargazers rarely see. It is Canopus, and it is the second-brightest star in the entire sky. You will not see this star from the northern U.S. or similar latitudes. However, northern skywatchers who travel south in winter – or people in latitudes like those in the southern U.S. – enjoy watching this star. You can always find Canopus by first locating Sirius, the sky’s ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 31, Star-hop from Great Square

Sky Tonight—January 31, Star-hop from Great Square of Pegasus to Andromeda galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight, try star-hopping to the famous Andromeda galaxy – the large spiral galaxy next-door to our Milky Way – from the Great Square of Pegasus. The planet Jupiter will be your guide. Ready? First, look westward for the four stars of the Great Square. You will find them to the right or upper right of the blazing planet Jupiter – in the west at nightfall and early evening. Keep in mind that our ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 29, Moon and Venus still close

Sky Tonight—January 29, Moon and Venus still close before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Wake up before sunrise tomorrow (Sunday, January 30) to see the moon and the planet Venus – the two brightest orbs of nighttime – lighting up the dawn and predawn sky. Our sky chart shows the sky scene as viewed from North America. Elsewhere around the world at this hour, expect the waning crescent moon and Venus to be positioned a little differently in your sky. Still, it hardly matters. In the wee ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 28, Moon and Venus in dawn and

Sky Tonight—January 28, Moon and Venus in dawn and predawn sky tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Given clear skies, you cannot miss seeing the waning crescent moon with the blazing planet Venus before sunrise tomorrow (Saturday, January 29). The moon and Venus rank as the second and third brightest celestial bodies in all the heavens. The sun, of course, ranks as the brightest celestial body of them all. Look into the east or southeast sky at or before dawn to enjoy the beautiful morning tableau. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 2, Earth’s closest

Sky Tonight—January 2, Earth’s closest approach to the sun in 2011

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org When 2011 began on January 1, our planet Earth was very close to its perihelion – its closest point to the sun for the year. That closest point will come tomorrow. In 2011, Earth will be closest to the sun on Monday, January 3 at 19 hours Universal Time (12 p.m. Mountain Time). How do I translate Universal Time to my time? Earth is closest to the sun every year in early January, when it is winter ... Full Story

Page 2 of 3123