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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘waning gibbous moon’

Sky Tonight—April 27, Leo loses his tail. We gain a

Sky Tonight—April 27, Leo loses his tail. We gain a constellation.

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart again shows the evening sky high to the south. To the upper left of the constellation Leo the Lion are dozens of very faint stars. They make up the constellation Coma Berenices, otherwise known as Berenice’s Hair. The Greek-Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy and others considered it the tuft at the end of Leo the Lion’s tail. Coma Berenices remained part of Leo until a few hundred years ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our diagram shows the constellation Leo the Lion for about 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. tonight. At this time, the Lion will be due south and at his highest point in the sky. Two distinctive star patterns make the Lion easy to identify. Leo’s brightest star – the sparkling blue-white gem Regulus – dots a backward question mark of stars known as The Sickle. If you see a Lion in this pattern of stars, the Sickle ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 25, Orion descends in the west

Sky Tonight—April 25, Orion descends in the west each evening

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The famous constellation Orion will soon disappear for another season. At this time of year, Orion is descending in the southwest to west in the hours after sunset. This constellation is noticeable for its bright stars and its distinctive pattern on the sky’s dome. Look for three stars in a short, straight row. Also look for Betelgeuse and Rigel, Orion’s brightest stars. If you did not come to know it ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 24, Predawn moon near the

Sky Tonight—March 24, Predawn moon near the Scorpion’s Stinger

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org On the morning of Friday, March 25, 2011, the waning gibbous moon helps you to locate the two “tail-end” stars of the constellation Scorpius the Scorpion. These two very noticeable stars – called Shaula and Lesath – are often shown on old star maps at the tip of the Scorpion’s stinger. Shaula and Lesath mean raised tail and stinger respectively in Arabic, although there is some controversy over ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 23, Moon near red star Antares

Sky Tonight—March 23, Moon near red star Antares before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you are an early riser, look out a south-facing window before dawn on March 24, 2011 – Thursday morning – to see a lovely waning gibbous moon in front of the constellation Scorpius the Scorpion. Understanding moon phases The reddish star near the moon is Antares, considered the Scorpion’s ruby heart. Antares is a red supergiant star, located roughly opposite in the sky from another famous red ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Tuesday, March 22, Mercury farthest from

Sky Tonight—Tuesday, March 22, Mercury farthest from sunset glare

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Mercury, the solar system’s innermost planet, never strays far from the sun and into Earth’s nighttime sky. Today, however, this world reaches its greatest elongation east of the sun at 7 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. Mercury swings to the end of its tether, at 19 degrees east of the sun. (For reference, your fist at an arm’s length approximates 10 degrees of sky.) Nineteen degrees east of the sun is ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 21, As Mercury sets, zodiacal

Sky Tonight—March 21, As Mercury sets, zodiacal light shines faintly in western sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org After the sun sets, you can see the elusive planet Mercury – and the even more elusive zodiacal light – in the western sky. For those living in the northern hemisphere, this next week presents the best chance in all of 2011 to see Mercury, the solar system’s innermost planet. Meanwhile, if you have a very dark sky, the zodiacal light can be seen in the west about an hour after sunset through March and ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 20, The 2011 March equinox

Sky Tonight—March 20, The 2011 March equinox

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The March equinox happens today at 23:21 Universal Time, which is 17:21 (5:21 p.m.) Mountain Daylight Time for us in the U.S. The March equinox signals the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere and autumn in the southern hemisphere. It marks that special moment when the sun crosses the celestial equator going from south to north. How do I translate Universal Time into my time? Celebrate ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 23, Moon by Scorpion’s Crown

Sky Tonight—Feb 23, Moon by Scorpion’s Crown before tomorrow’s dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Before dawn tomorrow – on Thursday, February 24 – the moon will be near the upper part of the constellation Scorpius. These three stars are sometimes called the Crown of the Scorpion. Scorpius – which now rises in the south-southeastern sky an hour or two after midnight – is the constellation of the Scorpion. Individually, the Crown stars are Graffias, Dschubba, and Pi Scorpii. It is rare ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 22, Stars in the daytime

Sky Tonight—Feb 22, Stars in the daytime

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org People often ask if stars are up there, beyond our blue sky, during the day. The answer is surely yes, because Earth is a planet in space, surrounded on all sides by stars. Here is a view looking southeast at morning in late February or early March. Of course you really cannot see the stars, but they are there. Cool image of daytime moon from December 18, 2010 The constellation behind the sun ... Full Story

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