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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘waning gibbous moon’

Sky Tonight—Feb 21, Zodiacal light is glowing

Sky Tonight—Feb 21, Zodiacal light is glowing pyramid in west after dark

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Moonless February and March evenings present the best time of year to see zodiacal light in the northern hemisphere evening sky. The light appears when all traces of twilight have left the sky. It looks like a hazy pyramid of light in the west after true darkness falls. This light can be noticeable and easy to see from latitudes like those in the southern U.S. I’ve seen it many times from the latitude ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 20, Moon, Saturn, Spica rise in late

Sky Tonight—Feb 20, Moon, Saturn, Spica rise in late evening

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Jupiter is the bright object in the west after sunset You will have to stay up late to see the waning gibbous moon, the planet Saturn, and the star Spica tonight. Alternatively, you can wake up early tomorrow. Our chart shows the eastern sky for mid-northern North American latitudes somewhere around 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. tonight. The sky scene will look similar for mid-northern latitudes in Europe and ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—Feb 19, The Hare and the Dove below the

Sky Tonight—Feb 19, The Hare and the Dove below the Hunter

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you look south around 8 p.m., you will easily notice a short, straight row of three medium bright stars. These stars represent the Belt of Orion the Hunter. Also, notice the star Sirius. Sirius: Dog Star and brightest star On old sky maps, the mighty Hunter of the ancient myths is seen poised with an upraised club and shield, as though fending off the raging Bull, Taurus. Jupiter is the bright ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—February 18, Moon rises with Leo the

Sky Tonight—February 18, Moon rises with Leo the Lion, harbinger of spring

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org About two hours after sunset on February 18, look for the waning gibbous moon and the constellation Leo the Lion shining side by side over the eastern horizon. The fainter stars of Leo might be hard to make out in the lunar glare tonight, but you should be able to spot Regulus, Leo’s brightest star, and one of the brightest stars in our night sky. Tomorrow, the moon will rise more than an hour later ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 25, Last quarter moon, Saturn,

Sky Tonight—January 25, Last quarter moon, Saturn, Spica before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The last quarter moon and the planet Saturn will shine on opposite sides of the bright star Spica before sunrise tomorrow (January 26). As seen from the northern hemisphere, the trio will appear southward before dawn. If you are more of a night owl than an early bird, and live at mid-northern latitudes, you can catch all three – the moon, Spica, and Saturn – in your southeastern sky around 1 a.m. to 2 ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 24, Moon, Saturn, Spica from

Sky Tonight—January 24, Moon, Saturn, Spica from midnight until dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you are willing to stay up late or to get up early, you can use the waning gibbous moon to find the planet Saturn and the constellation Virgo’s brightest star Spica. As seen from mid-northern latitudes, comparable to those in the United States, you might see all three luminaries – the moon, Saturn, Spica – low in your eastern sky by around midnight tonight. Farther north, the shining threesome ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—December 22, Moon and heavenly Twins

Sky Tonight—December 22, Moon and heavenly Twins

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The big and bright waning gibbous moon shines in front of Gemini the Twins tonight. Our chart today shows you the view toward the east-northeast sky about three hours after sunset. Gemini’s two brightest stars are Castor and Pollux. They shine quite close to the moon tonight. The moon and Gemini swing westward throughout the night, for the same reason the sun moves westward during the day. It is ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 28, Mira the Wonderful, a

EarthSky Tonight—Oct. 28, Mira the Wonderful, a famous variable star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Today’s chart looks shows you where to find Mira the Wonderful, the famous variable star, on October and November evenings. That is where you will find the constellation Cetus the Whale. Menkar is the brightest star in Cetus. It has located about 220 light-years away. Menkar resides in the Head of the Whale, which is shaped like a lopsided pentagon and which is generally the easiest part of Cetus to identify. Deneb ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Oct. 27, Where is the Big

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Oct. 27,  Where is the Big Dipper on these autumn evenings?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Where is the Big Dipper at nightfall and early evening? At this time of year, the most famous star pattern visible from this hemisphere – the Big Dipper – lurks low in the north during the evening hours. It is tough to spot the Dipper in the evening at this time of year, especially in the southern states, although you will see it before dawn around now, ascending in the northeast. Bright object in southeast on October ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—October 26, Moon farthest north,

EarthSky Tonight—October 26, Moon farthest north, near star Elnath

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org On October 26, the moon swings to the northernmost point in its monthly orbit around Earth, and tonight, the moon shines near Elnath, the constellation Taurus’ second brightest star. As seen from mid-northern latitudes, the waning gibbous moon and Elnath rise into the east-northwest sky around mid-evening. At middle latitudes south of the equator, the moon and Elnath rise by late evening or around midnight. The moon ... Full Story

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