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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘waning moon’

Sky Tonight—March 28, Tangle of stars in

Sky Tonight—March 28, Tangle of stars in Berenice’s Hair

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org What we are about to describe requires a dark sky to be seen: a faraway cluster of stars known as Coma Berenices. How can you spot it? One way is to use the famous constellation Leo the Lion, now in the east each evening. Leo is relatively easy to see. The front part of the Lion looks like a backwards question mark, and the back part is a little triangle, which includes the star Denebola, marked on today’s ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 27, Use the Big Dipper to locate

Sky Tonight—March 27, Use the Big Dipper to locate the Hunting Dogs

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org You can easily locate the Big Dipper in the northeast sky on these early springtime evenings. The Big Dipper is part of the constellation Ursa Major, the Greater Bear. If you can find the Big Dipper, you can also find two Hunting Dogs seen by the ancient stargazers to be nipping at the Bear’s heels. The Hunting Dogs are a separate constellation: tiny Canes Venatici. You will need a dark sky to see these ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 26, Is Sirius the most luminous

Sky Tonight—March 26, Is Sirius the most luminous star in the sky?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Look southward at dusk and nightfall, and you can’t miss Sirius, the brightest star in the nighttime sky. Mia asks, “Isn’t there a brighter star in absolute magnitude which appears dimmer because of its distance?” Yes, Mia, you are right. Sirius, in the constellation Canis Major (the Greater Dog), looks extraordinarily bright in Earth’s sky because it is only 8.6 light-years away. Many stars on ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—March 25, The westward shift of Orion

Sky Tonight—March 25, The westward shift of Orion and all the stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org We got this question: Orion seems to have moved and turned considerably in the last two weeks. Will Orion disappear before summer? The answer is that all the stars and constellations shift westward as the seasons pass . . . and they also move westward in the course of a single night. Orion is no exception. Exactly when Orion will disappear from the evening sky – into the sunset – depends on your ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 23, Eridanus-a winding river of

Sky Tonight—January 23, Eridanus-a winding river of stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Bright star in southwest on January evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter Here is a constellation for you if you have access to a very dark sky: Eridanus the River. You will not see this one from the city, or even the suburbs. Eridanus the River begins near the star Rigel in the constellation Orion the Hunter – and wells up in a great loop before ambling back down toward the southern horizon. Rigel: ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 22, Faint, fuzzy object near

Sky Tonight—January 22, Faint, fuzzy object near Sirius is a star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org A reader wrote, "On November 4, I went to study the constellation Orion, but first I had to see the star Sirius and there was a glimmer below Sirius and upon looking, it seemed to be a very nice comet. Has anyone else seen this? I am a newby … (and) would like someone to verify if they see this. I am quite up and excited." It was not a comet, but very likely was a lovely star cluster called M41. So, the ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 21, Identify the Winter Circle

Sky Tonight—January 21, Identify the Winter Circle and winter’s brightest stars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart covers a wider area of sky than what we typically show. It is in answer to a reader in Nashville, who wrote, I have heard mention of the Winter Circle of Stars. Could you list the stars in this circle? You will find these stars at this time of year by looking east-southeast at early to mid evening. Again, this is a large pattern and covers a wide area of sky, but as always, it is ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 3, Quadrantid meteors for Asia

Sky Tonight—January 3, Quadrantid meteors for Asia and Europe before dawn January 4

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Two major events will take place tomorrow – on Tuesday, January 4 – a meteor shower and a solar eclipse. Neither one is particular well placed for the Americas. The annual Quadrantid meteor shower is expected to produce its greatest number of meteors in the wee hours before dawn tomorrow. If predictions hold true, it should be best seen from western Asia and Eastern Europe. Then a partial eclipse of ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—December 31, See brightest star at

Sky Tonight—December 31, See brightest star at midnight

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Sirius in the constellation Canis Major – the legendary Dog Star – should be called the New Year’s star. This star – the brightest star in our sky – celebrates 2011 and every new year by reaching its highest point in the sky around the stroke of midnight. How can you find Sirius? It is easy because this star is the brightest one we see from Earth. Its name means ‘Sparkling’ or ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—December 30, Moon and Venus will shine

Sky Tonight—December 30, Moon and Venus will shine before dawn tomorrow

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The final morning of 2010 – tomorrow morning, December 31 – will feature the moon with the planet Venus in the eastern sky before sunrise. It should be quite a treat, because the moon and Venus rank as the second- and third-brightest celestial bodies in Earth’s sky. Depending on where you live worldwide, Venus and the moon will rise above the eastern horizon some 3 to 4 hours before sunup, to light ... Full Story

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