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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘waxing crescent moon’

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 9, Use constellation Cassiopeia

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 9, Use constellation Cassiopeia to find Andromeda galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org David Smith of Michigan wrote, "What is the easiest way to find the Andromeda galaxy at this time of year?" “I tried a couple times with my telescope, but had no luck." Dave, the image at right shows the view of the Andromeda galaxy through a telescope. We hope you are not looking through the eyepiece of your telescope when sweeping through the sky for this galaxy. That would be hard. You need a wider field of view ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 8, Young moon easier to spot

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 8, Young moon easier to spot after sunset on November 8

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The young waxing crescent moon should be much easier to spot after sunset this evening than it was yesterday. Yesterday, the moon shone closer to the setting sun, so the moon followed the sunbeneath the horizon shortly after sundown. Tonight’s moon will be higher in the sky and will stay out longer after sunset. From our mid-northern latitudes, the lunar crescent sits low in the southwest sky at dusk and nightfall. ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Nov 7, Can you see the

EarthSky Tonight—Tonight Nov 7, Can you see the young moon?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Bright object in the southeast on November evenings? It’s the planet Jupiter Will you catch the young moon slip in and out of the twilight dusk after sunset tonight? You might, if you live at mid-northern latitudes or farther south in North America. At mid-northern latitudes in Europe and Asia, you will have to wait until after sunset Monday. However, all latitudes south of the equator have a decent chance of spotting ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 13, Waxing moon near

EarthSky Tonight—September 13, Waxing moon near Scorpion’s Heart

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Here is a familiar figure – to stargazers – and to Texans like me. Just yesterday, my little neighbor – age 5 – told me she saw a scorpion. To those of us who watch the skies, the chance to see a celestial Scorpion is present mostly in the summer months. Here it is – Scorpius the Scorpion – only visible at nightfall and very early evening now that summer has faded away. Bright star in east? Might be planet ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 12, Moon, Venus and a

EarthSky Tonight—September 12,  Moon, Venus and a double star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our chart shows the moon, the planet Venus and the star Zubenelgenubi as they appear about one hour after sunset. The sky scene, though specifically for mid-northern latitudes in North America, will look similar at mid-northern latitudes all around the world. However, European and Asian observers will see the moon somewhat closer to Zubenelgenubi, the constellation Libra’s rather faint yet visible star. Bright star in ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 11, Moon and Venus low

EarthSky Tonight—September 11,  Moon and Venus low in west at dusk

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing crescent moon and the dazzling planet Venus are the first two celestial lights to appear after sunset this evening. Look low in the west to see the shining pair at dusk and early evening. After the sun, the moon and Venus rank as the second and third brightest heavenly bodies, respectively. When these brilliant sky objects get together, people across Earth’s entire globe spot them and gaze with wonder. Since ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 10, Moon waxes as Venus

EarthSky Tonight—September 10,  Moon waxes as Venus wanes in September evening sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The waxing crescent moon and the blazing planet Venus shine low in the west at dusk. Our chart shows the sky scene for about 45 minutes after sundown, with the moon barely above the horizon. If you miss the moon with Venus this evening, try again tomorrow. On Saturday, the lunar crescent will appear higher in the sky and will set later after sunset. Whenever the moon appears in the west at dusk and early evening, it is ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica,

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica, Venus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the west after sunset tonight, you will find Spica and the waxing crescent moon. The planets to the right of the moon are Mars, Venus and Saturn. Of those planets, Venus will be easiest to see because it is so bright. You might need binoculars for Mars and Saturn. Spica is known as a blue-white star. Can you detect its color in contrast to nearby stars? If not, try looking at Spica with binoculars. Spica isn’t ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 17, View Mars tonight via

Earthsky Tonight—June 17, View Mars tonight via reflected sunlight nearly 28 minutes old

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The crescent moon glides by Mars tonight, making it easy to identify the planet, which has been getting dimmer for the past few months. If you face west about an hour after sunset, Mars is the yellow or orange “star” just to the north of the moon. Saturn, very slightly brighter than Mars, is a bit farther from and above the moon. Mars is known as the “Red Planet,” but most people do not see it with a truly red ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 16, Waxing Crescent Moon meets

Earthsky Tonight—June 16, Waxing Crescent Moon meets the “Little King” of Leo

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you have been watching the crescent moon over the past few days, you know that since it passed Venus a couple of nights ago, it slips farther east and is slightly fuller each evening. Tonight it is well placed in the sunset sky in the early evening, appearing to pass near Regulus, the “Little King” or “Heart of the Lion,” in Leo. Face the western sky just after it gets dark and you can easily find the lunar ... Full Story

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