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Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Posts Tagged ‘Moon tonight’

Earthsky Tonight —April 20, Vega marks radiant point

Earthsky Tonight —April 20, Vega marks radiant point of April’s Lyrid meteor shower

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The 2010 Lyrid meteor shower is now picking up steam. This shower is expected to produce the most meteors in the dark hours before dawn on Thursday, April 22. The evening before, on April 21, Mars will be near the moon. The approximate direction of the radiant point for the Lyrid meteors is toward Vega, the heaven’s 5th brightest star and the brightest light in the constellation Lyra. The radiant point for the meteors sits just ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 19, two stars lead to

Earthsky Tonight — April 19, two stars lead to constellation Hercules

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The constellation Hercules the Kneeling Giant can be seen ascending in the east-northeast on these spring evenings. Our chart today shows the sky for late night, when all of these objects are well up in the northeastern to eastern sky. The stars Arcturus and Vega can help you identify Hercules, whose most noticeable pattern is a squarish figure in the center of the constellation. This sky pattern, or “asterism,” is known as ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 18, Spica, your guide star

Earthsky Tonight — April 18, Spica, your guide star to Omega Centauri

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Silvery-blue Spica, the only prominent star in the constellation Virgo, acts as your guide to the Omega Centauri globular star cluster. To the unaided eye, Omega Centauri looks like a fairly faint (and possibly fuzzy) star. Very few of the Milky Way galaxy’s 250 or so globular clusters are readily visible without optics. To find Spica, extend the curve of the Big Dipper handle, as illustrated on our April 4 EarthSky Tonight. ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 17, Heavenly Chariot flies

Earthsky Tonight — April 17,  Heavenly Chariot flies in west at nightfall

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org As darkness falls, there are several ways to distinguish the brilliant star Capella from the other bright stars in the western half of sky. Capella, the northernmost first-magnitude star, is the farthest bright star to your right as you’re facing west. In addition, Capella looks yellow, like our sun. Moreover, Capella has a famous trio of starlets accompanying her, dubbed “The Kids.” Moreover, at nightfall and early evening ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 16, Moon between Venus and

Earthsky Tonight — April 16,  Moon between Venus and Pleiades

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the western sky for early evening. The slender waxing crescent moon sits between the blazing planet Venus and the Pleiades star cluster. To the moon’s upper left shines the ruddy star Aldebaran, the brightest in the constellation Taurus the Bull. You should have little trouble spotting Venus, the third brightest celestial object to light up the heavens, after the sun and the moon. However, you might need ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – April 15: Catch the moon and

Earthsky Tonight – April 15: Catch the moon and Mercury after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Did you see the planet Mercury adorning the evening twilight earlier this month? On our April 8 program, for instance, we showed you Mercury next to the blazing planet Venus at dusk and early evening. Be forewarned. Mercury will be much harder to find this evening than it was at that time. Mercury will be several to many times fainter than it was in late March and early April. Moreover, Mercury will set about 45 minutes earlier ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight —April 14: Sundial noon and clock

Earthsky Tonight —April 14: Sundial noon and clock noon agree in mid April

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Every year around middle April, time by the sun and the clock both agree. For instance, when the midday sun climbs highest in the sky at this time of year, the sundial reads 12:00 noon and your local clock time says 12:00 noon. Your local clock time is the same as standard clock time, as long as you live on the meridian that governs your time zone. If you live east of the time zone line, then your local time runs ahead of standard ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive

Earthsky Tonight — April 13: Mars and Beehive cluster pair up in mid April

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org These mid-April evenings provide you with a golden opportunity to see the Beehive star cluster, the crown jewel of the constellation Cancer the Crab. The moon will be absent from the sky for the next several evenings, featuring dark nights for observing this deep-sky treasure. The Beehive is faintly visible to the unaided eye in a dark country sky. However, you really need binoculars to transform this hazy smudge of light into the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 12: Star-hop from Leo to

Earthsky Tonight — April 12: Star-hop from Leo to the Coma star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We show the constellation Leo the Lion for about 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. tonight. At this time, the Lion will be due south and at his highest point in the sky. Two distinctive star patterns make the Lion fairly easy to identify. Leo’s brightest star – the sparkling blue-white gem Regulus – dots a backward question mark of stars known as The Sickle. If you could see a Lion in this pattern of stars, The Sickle would outline the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—April 10: Crescent moon above

Earthsky Tonight—April 10: Crescent moon above Jupiter at dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org About 30 to 60 minutes before sunrise on April 11, look for the waning crescent moon to shine above the dazzling planet Jupiter, with Jupiter barely above the eastern horizon. Binoculars help you to spot these two worlds. Although the moon and Jupiter appear close together at Sunday dawn, they are not really near each other in space. These worlds simply reside on nearly the same line of sight now. The moon, our closest celestial ... Full Story

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