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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Posts Tagged ‘Moon tonight’

EarthSky Tonight—Oct 3, Find the Andromeda galaxy

EarthSky Tonight—Oct 3,  Find the Andromeda galaxy on dark autumn nights

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Find the Andromeda galaxy on these dark autumn nights. The large square pattern on today’s chart is the Great Square in the constellation Pegasus. The constellation Andromeda can be seen as two streams of stars extending from one side of the Square, beginning at the star Alpheratz. I learned to find the Andromeda galaxy by star-hopping from the Great Square to the two stars marked here – first Mirach, then Mu Andromedae. An ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Oct 2, Jupiter is a guide to Great

EarthSky Tonight—Oct 2,  Jupiter is a guide to Great Square

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org A fixture of the autumn night sky, the Great Square of Pegasus appears to the upper left of the blazing planet Jupiter at early evening. For some idea of the Great Square’s size, extend your hand an arm length from your eye. These stars are far enough apart so that the width of your hand should slip in between any two Great Square stars. By the way, if you are a baseball fan, you might imagine these four stars as a celestial ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 30, What bright star flashes

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 30, What bright star flashes red and green in northeast?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Every year in late September and early October, we get questions from people who see a bright star twinkling with red and green flashes, low in the northeastern sky. Capella is a golden star when seen higher up in the sky. If you could travel to it in space, you’d find that it’s actually two golden stars, both with roughly the same surface temperature as our local star, the sun . . . but both larger and brighter than the ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 27, Summer Triangle high

EarthSky Tonight—September 27,  Summer Triangle high overhead on autumn evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Even as autumn is beginning, we still have several months to watch the large asterism known as the Summer Triangle. This huge star pattern looms from south to overhead in the autumn evening sky. The Summer Triangle consists of three bright stars in three separate constellations. The stars are Vega in the constellation Lyra, Deneb in the constellation Cygnus, and Altair in the constellation Aquila. Today’s chart has you looking ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 26, The first point of Aries

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 26, The first point of Aries marks March equinox point

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In ancient times, the March equinox sun shone in front of the rather small constellation Aries the Ram. You can find this constellation ascending in the east around 9 to 10 p.m. tonight, the Ram’s starlit bust perhaps faintly visible to the upper right of the waning gibbous moon. Be forewarned. Aries is not conspicuous, especially in the moonlit glare. Tomorrow night, at this time, a smaller waning gibbous moon will shine right ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 25, Look for daytime moon

EarthSky Tonight—September 25, Look for daytime moon after sunrise September 25-28

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Sylvia wrote, “When is the best time to see the moon in the sky during daylight hours?” Sylvia, it is easier to see a daytime moon when the moon is fairly far from the sun in the sky. When would that be? It would be around the time of full moon each month. A full moon is always 180 degrees from the sun, on the opposite side of the sky’s dome. Full moon was September 23. Generally, the full moon sets around sunrise. ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 21, Jupiter’s closest

EarthSky Tonight—September 21, Jupiter’s closest opposition since 1963

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object by late September 2010 In 2010, Jupiter came closest to Earth on September 20 – yesterday – at 21 hours Universal Time (4 p.m. Central Daylight Time). Then Jupiter was only 368 million miles away. Today Earth passes between the sun and Jupiter, placing Jupiter opposite the sun in our sky. Astronomers call this event an opposition of Jupiter. The 2010 opposition is Jupiter’s ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 20, Fastest sunsets of

EarthSky Tonight—September 20,  Fastest sunsets of the year around equinox time

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object by late September 2010 Does the sun set faster around the time of an equinox? The answer is yes. The fastest sunsets (and sunrises) occur at or near the equinoxes. What’s more, the slowest sunsets (and sunrises) occur at or near the solstices. This is true whether you live in the northern or southern hemisphere. By the way, when we say sunset here, we are talking about the ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 7, Use Big Dipper to

EarthSky Tonight—September 7,  Use Big Dipper to find Polaris, the North Star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart shows the Polaris, the Big and Little Dippers for a September evening. Notice that a line from the two outermost stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper point to Polaris, the North Star. Also notice that Polaris marks the tip of the handle of the Little Dipper. Bright star in east? Might be planet Jupiter, nearly at its closest since 1951. The Big Dipper swings full circle (360 degrees) around Polaris in about 23 ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 6, Star-hop to Sirius

EarthSky Tonight—September 6, Star-hop to Sirius from Orion’s Belt

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Sure, we have said it before, but we will say it again, because it is one of the neatest tricks in all the heavens. That is … Orion’s Belt points to Sirius. Sirius is the brightest star in the sky. It is up before dawn now, but will be shifting into the evening sky as the months pass. You can find Orion. Trust me. If you go outside and look southward before dawn now, you will notice Orion’s Belt, which consists of a short, ... Full Story

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