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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Monday, July 28, 2014

‘Earth & Sky’ Archives

EarthSky Tonight—Oct 1, Venus and Mars close but

EarthSky Tonight—Oct 1,  Venus and Mars close but hard to spot after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The planets Venus and Mars are in conjunction today (Friday, October 1). However, if you live at mid-northern latitudes, it will not be easy to spot these two worlds after sunset. You will probably need binoculars to spot them low in the sky and in the glow of twilight. Our sky chart shows the sky scene for about 30 to 40 minutes after sundown, shortly before Venus and Mars follow the sun beneath the horizon. We draw in ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 30, What bright star flashes

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 30, What bright star flashes red and green in northeast?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Every year in late September and early October, we get questions from people who see a bright star twinkling with red and green flashes, low in the northeastern sky. Capella is a golden star when seen higher up in the sky. If you could travel to it in space, you’d find that it’s actually two golden stars, both with roughly the same surface temperature as our local star, the sun . . . but both larger and brighter than the ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 29, Star-hop from Great

EarthSky Tonight—Sept. 29, Star-hop from Great Square to Andromeda galaxy

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The Great Square of Pegasus is a great jumping off point for finding the Andromeda galaxy, otherwise known as M31. The Great Square sparkles over your eastern horizon at early evening, then travels westward across the sky throughout the night. For some idea of the Great Square’s size, extend your hand an arm length from your eye. You will see that any two Great Square stars are farther apart than the width of your ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 28, How to find the

EarthSky Tonight—September 28, How to find the loneliest star

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Which star is loneliest? Most people would say the answer is Fomalhaut, a bright star in the constellation Piscis Austrinus the Southern Fish. The coming month or so is the best time to see this star. So, go outside now … and learn to keep company with the loneliest star. On this autumn night, at about 8 to 9 p.m., look for a solitary star that’s peeking out at you just above the southeast horizon. Do you see it? No ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 27, Summer Triangle high

EarthSky Tonight—September 27,  Summer Triangle high overhead on autumn evenings

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Even as autumn is beginning, we still have several months to watch the large asterism known as the Summer Triangle. This huge star pattern looms from south to overhead in the autumn evening sky. The Summer Triangle consists of three bright stars in three separate constellations. The stars are Vega in the constellation Lyra, Deneb in the constellation Cygnus, and Altair in the constellation Aquila. Today’s chart has ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 26, The first point of Aries

EarthSky Tonight—Sept 26, The first point of Aries marks March equinox point

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In ancient times, the March equinox sun shone in front of the rather small constellation Aries the Ram. You can find this constellation ascending in the east around 9 to 10 p.m. tonight, the Ram’s starlit bust perhaps faintly visible to the upper right of the waning gibbous moon. Be forewarned. Aries is not conspicuous, especially in the moonlit glare. Tomorrow night, at this time, a smaller waning gibbous moon will shine ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 25, Look for daytime moon

EarthSky Tonight—September 25, Look for daytime moon after sunrise September 25-28

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Sylvia wrote, “When is the best time to see the moon in the sky during daylight hours?” Sylvia, it is easier to see a daytime moon when the moon is fairly far from the sun in the sky. When would that be? It would be around the time of full moon each month. A full moon is always 180 degrees from the sun, on the opposite side of the sky’s dome. Full moon was September 23. Generally, the full moon sets around ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 24, Harvest moon, Jupiter

EarthSky Tonight—September 24, Harvest moon, Jupiter still out dusk to dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org If you live at mid or far northern latitudes, the Harvest Moon and the blazing planet Jupiter will shine from dusk until dawn for yet another night. That is in spite of the fact that the full moon has already passed. (See our September 22 program.) The legendary Full Harvest Moon is famous for ushering in the year’s longest procession of moonlit nights. Why does the Full Harvest Moon in particular – the full moon ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-Sept 23 Harvest Moon, Jupiter,

EarthSky Tonight-Sept 23 Harvest Moon, Jupiter, equinox

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The Harvest Moon and the blazing planet Jupiter shine all night long tonight to commemorate the first full night of the autumn season. By common practice, we use the September equinox to mark the start of autumn, and call the closest full moon to the autumnal equinox the Full Harvest Moon. In 2010, the Harvest Moon comes only 6 hours after the September equinox. If you live in the southern hemisphere, the September ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 22, Harvest moon,

EarthSky Tonight—September 22,  Harvest moon, Jupiter, Autumn equinox

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Comet Hartley 2 might brighten to binocular object in late September The equinox falls at 9:09 p.m. on this Wednesday evening, according to clocks set to Mountain Daylight Time. That translates to 3:09 a.m. tomorrow – on Thursday, September 23 – Universal Time. So some calendars will show today as the equinox, and others will show tomorrow. Everything you need to know about the autumnal equinox of 2010 Here are ... Full Story

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