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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Monday, July 28, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘EarthSky’

Earthsky Tonight—July 20, Moon and Antares cross the

Earthsky Tonight—July 20, Moon and Antares cross the sky together

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org There’s a bright star to the east (left) of tonight’s waxing gibbous moon. It’s Antares, often called the Heart of the Scorpion in the constellation Scorpius. You can’t miss this star because it’s bright and reddish in color. Because it’s low in the sky as seen from the northern hemisphere, people in this part of the world often notice that Antares twinkles a lot. You’ll find the moon to the west (right) ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 19, Summer Triangle: Altair

Earthsky Tonight—July 19, Summer Triangle: Altair and Aquila the Eagle

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the east after dark, near the horizon, Altair, the brightest star in the constellation Aquila, the Eagle, springs into view. This is the bottom star of the Summer Triangle. The Great Rift of the Summer Milky Way passes through the Summer Triangle, between the stars Vega and Altair. Thought the Great Rift and the Milky Way will be hard to see tonight because of the waxing gibbous moon. In dark skies in late July and the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 18,Moon moves past Spica,

Earthsky Tonight—July 18,Moon moves past Spica, approaches celestial ‘Gateway’

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Can you see that the moon is farther from Spica tonight than it was last night? The moon is shifting farther and farthest east, with respect to the stars, each day. The moon always moves toward the east on our sky’s dome. This motion is a translation on our sky’s dome of the moon’s orbit around Earth. You can observe the moon’s orbital motion from one night to the next by watching the moon’s location with respect ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 17, Lunar night versus lunar

Earthsky Tonight—July 17, Lunar night versus lunar day

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org When darkness falls this evening the moon, as always, appears in a more easterly location on our sky’s dome than it did the night before. The bright star near the moon tonight is Spica in the constellation Virgo. The string of lights to the right and lower right of the moon and Spica at early evening are the planets Saturn, Mars and Venus. Tonight’s moon is still at a waxing crescent, but it’s an extremely fat ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 16, Summer Triangle: Deneb and

Earthsky Tonight—July 16, Summer Triangle: Deneb and Cygnus the Swan

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org This evening, the fat waxing crescent moon shines by the planets Saturn and Mars in your southwest or western sky. For a sky chart of the evening planets, we refer you to yesterday’s program. Be sure to notice how the position of tonight’s moon relative to Saturn and Mars has changed since yesterday. Tonight’s chart faces a different section of sky than where the moon and planets reside. We are looking eastward at ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—Moon close to Mars. Venus, Mercury,

Earthsky Tonight—Moon close to Mars. Venus, Mercury, Saturn nearby

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Have you been watching the string of planets adorning the July evening sky after sunset? If so, you might have noticed that the order of the planets from up to down – Saturn, Mars, Venus and Mercury – has remained steady throughout the month. However, the moon’s position relative to the planetary line-up has been changing, with the moon now climbing this stairway of planets day by day by day by day! Yesterday ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 13, Young moon, Mercury sit

Earthsky Tonight—July 13, Young moon, Mercury sit close to horizon after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the sky for mid-northern North American latitudes at about 45 minutes after sunset. If you have a level horizon and crystal-clear skies, you might catch the thin waxing crescent moon and the planet Mercury next to the horizon. Mercury sets about one hour after the sun and the moon sets about one hour and 15 minutes after. So, they’ll be hard to catch in the twilight glare. Try binoculars! Looking for ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight— July 12, Summer Triangle: Vega and

Earthsky Tonight— July 12, Summer Triangle: Vega and its constellation Lyra

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Look eastward this evening, and it’s hard to miss the season’s signature star formation, called the Summer Triangle. Its stars — Vega, Deneb and Altair — are the first three to light up the eastern half of sky after sunset, and their bright and sparkling radiance is even visible from light-polluted cities. Try looking first for the most prominent star in the eastern sky, which is Vega in the constellation Lyra the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July ll, When is the next total

Earthsky Tonight—July ll, When is the next total solar eclipse in the U.S.?

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org A total eclipse of the sun takes place today, but not in the United States. To see it – one of nature’s grandest spectacles – you must be located along today’s long yet narrow total eclipse path that stretches across the South Pacific. Eclipse path for July 11, 2010 total solar eclipse People ask when a total solar eclipse will be visible in the mainland United States. It won’t happen until August 21, 2017. ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight— July 10,Total solar eclipse over

Earthsky Tonight— July 10,Total solar eclipse over South Pacific on July 11

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org A total eclipse of the sun rates as one of nature’s grandest spectacles. The new moon completely covers over the solar disk, momentarily turning day into night, and bringing the planets and brighter stars into view. During a total solar eclipse, you can see the sun’s normally invisible yet beautiful corona encircling the new moon silhouette. This year’s only solar eclipse takes place tomorrow, on Sunday, July 11. A ... Full Story

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