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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Jupiter’

EarthSky Tonight—August 24, August full moon is

EarthSky Tonight—August 24, August full moon is smallest, farthest full moon in 2010

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The August 2010 full moon is the smallest, farthest full moon of the year. It lies more than 252,000 miles away, in contrast to the moon’s average distance of about 239,000 miles. Farthest and closest full moons recur in regular cycles. The closest full moon comes 7 lunar months – in other words, 7 full moons – after the farthest full moon. Then the farthest full moon comes 7 lunar months after the closest full ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 23, Venus points way to

EarthSky Tonight—August 23, Venus points way to fainter Mars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org How soon can you spot Venus above the western horizon as the sun sets? From the northern hemisphere, the ecliptic – the line in the sky that marks the path of the sun, as well as its attendant planets – makes a shallow angle with the horizon. The slant of the ecliptic is more perpendicular to the horizon in the southern hemisphere, making Venus stand tall during twilight. Shining at magnitude -4.4, Venus easily pierces ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 28, Moonlight wipes out Delta

Earthsky Tonight—July 28, Moonlight wipes out Delta Aquarid meteor shower

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The annual Delta Aquarid meteor shower is expected to peak before dawn on Thursday, July 29. Not that it really matters in 2010. The almost-full waning gibbous moon will wipe out this year’s Delta Aquarid display. You would be much better off to wait for the Perseid shower, which should be at its best on the moon-free nights of August 12 and August 13. EarthSky’s meteor shower guide for 2010 Even in a favorable ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 23, Jupiter appears to stop,

Earthsky Tonight—July 23, Jupiter appears to stop, then change direction

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Jupiter may be a giant planet, but compared to Earth it moves like an oxcart in the race around the sun. The Earth’s average speed is about 67,000 miles an hour, while Jupiter lumbers along at less than half that speed, or about 29,000 miles an hour. Because of its faster speed and shorter distance to go around its orbit, our Earth laps Jupiter about once every 13 months. It is a lot like a fast racecar in the inner track ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 9, 2010: Venus and Regulus in

Earthsky Tonight—July 9, 2010: Venus and Regulus in conjunction

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The dazzling planet Venus and the star Regulus are in conjunction at 9 p.m. Central Daylight Time this evening. That means they are north and south of one another on the sky’s dome, with a small gap separating the two. This evening, Venus and Regulus shine about the same distance apart as the width of your little finger, held at arm’s length. Although Regulus is a very bright star, it pales next to Venus, which is the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 3: Moon and Jupiter again

Earthsky Tonight—July 3: Moon and Jupiter again between midnight and dawn July 4

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The darkness between midnight and dawn belongs to the last-quarter moon and Jupiter. They appear in the east as today becomes tomorrow, and steadily climb into the sky. Jupiter is the solar system’s largest planet, more massive than all the other planets, moons, and other debris combined. And we are lucky to have it. Astronomers believe that its gravitational presence has kept Earth safe by sending asteroids and comets ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 2: Watch for the moon near

Earthsky Tonight—July 2: Watch for the moon near Jupiter before dawn July 3

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight the moon rises around midnight (daylight saving time). It is slightly gibbous, just a day before first-quarter phase. Brilliant Jupiter soon joins it above the eastern horizon. From mid-northern latitudes, by the time the short, summer night brightens into morning twilight the King of Planets climbs about halfway up the sky in the southeast. Observers in the southern hemisphere, who are enjoying their long, winter ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 13: Year’s earliest sunrises

Earthsky Tonight—June 13: Year’s earliest sunrises for northern latitudes

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org For all of us in the northern hemisphere, the earliest sunrises of the year are happening now, despite the fact that the solstice is still a week away. If you are privileged enough to be outdoors before one of these early sunrises, you’ll find some of the most beautiful dawn twilights of the year … and, in 2010, you’ll also find the second brightest of all planets, Jupiter, blazing away in the southeast sky. For the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 7: Closest two planets of 2010

Earthsky Tonight—June 7: Closest two planets of 2010 on June 8, but one may require binoculars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The closest planet/planet pairing takes place in the morning sky on Tuesday, June 8. Jupiter and Uranus stand less than 1/2 degree apart. (For reference, the moon’s diameter spans 1/2 degree of sky.) The brighter of these two planets, Jupiter, beams as the brightest celestial point of light in the dawn and predawn sky. Uranus, though, only appears about 1/2000 as bright as Jupiter. In other words, you will need a dark ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—June 5: Moon and Jupiter pair up

Earthsky Tonight—June 5: Moon and Jupiter pair up before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Before daybreak tomorrow (Sunday, June 6), the two most brilliant heavenly bodies of the early morning sky – the waning crescent moon and the dazzling planet Jupiter – couple up together to light up the dawn and predawn hours. The moon and Jupiter showcase themselves all over the world, except at far northern latitudes near and north of the Arctic Circle. That far north, the June sun shines for 24 hours, or nearly 24 ... Full Story

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