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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Saturn’

Sky Tonight—December 27, Moon, bright star, two

Sky Tonight—December 27, Moon, bright star, two planets before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Before dawn tomorrow (Tuesday, December 28), look in the east for the planet Saturn and star Spica near the last quarter moon. Beneath this threesome – moon, Saturn and Spica – you will see the blazing planet Venus much closer to the eastern predawn horizon. You might be seeing these objects when there is a fair amount of predawn twilight washing the sky. The planets and stars have colors of their own. Saturn ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 24,Venus getting brighter in

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 24,Venus getting brighter in the predawn sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The planet Venus – the most brilliant celestial object after the sun and moon – is getting brighter day by day in the November predawn sky. This dazzling world was in our evening sky earlier this year. However, it recently passed between earth and the sun, so that it now rises about 3 hours before sunrise as seen from mid-northern latitudes. Moreover, at middle latitudes south of the equator, Venus rises less ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 5, Hazy pyramid of light

EarthSky Tonight—September 5, Hazy pyramid of light in east? False dawn.

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Late summer and early autumn present the best time of year to see the false dawn, also known as the zodiacal light. With the moon out of the morning sky for the next two weeks, this is your chance to catch the zodiacal light before dawn. This light can be noticeable and easy to see from latitudes like those in the southern U.S. I’ve seen it many times from the latitude of southern Texas, sometimes while driving a lonely ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica,

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica, Venus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the west after sunset tonight, you will find Spica and the waxing crescent moon. The planets to the right of the moon are Mars, Venus and Saturn. Of those planets, Venus will be easiest to see because it is so bright. You might need binoculars for Mars and Saturn. Spica is known as a blue-white star. Can you detect its color in contrast to nearby stars? If not, try looking at Spica with binoculars. Spica isn’t just one ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 7, Venus, Mars, Saturn form

Earthsky Tonight—August 7, Venus, Mars, Saturn form planetary trio in west

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Around August 7 and 8, look in the west after sunset for the planets Venus, Mars and Saturn as they form what is known as a planetary trio. Around August 7 and 8, look in the west after sunset for the planets Venus, Mars and Saturn as they form what is known as a planetary trio. A planetary trio is a grouping of three planets that fits inside a circle that is only 5 degrees wide. Typically, a binocular field spans about 5 degrees, ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 27, Saturn, Mars, Venus –

Earthsky Tonight—July 27, Saturn, Mars, Venus – close pairing of Regulus and Mercury

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The planets Saturn, Mars and Venus are still in the west after sunset, to the delight of stargazers across the globe. In addition, the planet Mercury –our solar system’s innermost world – teams up with Regulus around now in the same part of the sky. Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion. Tonight, Mercury and Regulus form the year’s closest pairing of a planet with a first-magnitude star. Look for ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 24,Why the hottest weather is

Earthsky Tonight—July 24,Why the hottest weather is not on the longest day

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Look westward at nightfall to see three planets in the July evening sky. In their order of brightness, these worlds are Venus, Saturn and Mars. Venus outshines Saturn and Mars by leaps and bounds. Venus is the first “star” to pop into view after sunset. If you keep watching the western sky into early August, you will see these three form a tight cluster in the west after sunset. EarthSky’s meteor guide for 2010 By the way, ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—Moon close to Mars. Venus, Mercury,

Earthsky Tonight—Moon close to Mars. Venus, Mercury, Saturn nearby

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Have you been watching the string of planets adorning the July evening sky after sunset? If so, you might have noticed that the order of the planets from up to down – Saturn, Mars, Venus and Mercury – has remained steady throughout the month. However, the moon’s position relative to the planetary line-up has been changing, with the moon now climbing this stairway of planets day by day by day by day! Yesterday evening, the ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—July 13, Young moon, Mercury sit

Earthsky Tonight—July 13, Young moon, Mercury sit close to horizon after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our sky chart shows the sky for mid-northern North American latitudes at about 45 minutes after sunset. If you have a level horizon and crystal-clear skies, you might catch the thin waxing crescent moon and the planet Mercury next to the horizon. Mercury sets about one hour after the sun and the moon sets about one hour and 15 minutes after. So, they’ll be hard to catch in the twilight glare. Try binoculars! Looking for a sky ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight-June 27: Latest sunsets of the year

EarthSky Tonight-June 27: Latest sunsets of the year in late June

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org For people living around 40 degrees north latitude, the latest sunset of the year happens around now. In the southern hemisphere, at 40 degrees south latitude, it is the year’s latest sunrise that is happening around now. That is in spite of the fact that the longest or shortest day of the year (in terms of daylight) took place about a week ago, on the June 21 solstice. To celebrate these late June sunsets, our sky chart shows ... Full Story

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