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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Saturn’

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

  Titan, Rings, and Saturn from Cassini Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA Explanation: How thin are the rings of Saturn? Brightness measurements from different angles have shown Saturn's rings to be about one kilometer thick, making them many times thinner, in relative proportion, than a razor blade. This thinness sometimes appears in dramatic fashion during an image taken nearly along the ring plane. The robot Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn has now ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 27, Saturn starts retrograde on

Sky Tonight—January 27, Saturn starts retrograde on January 27

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Starting today – on January 27, 2011 – Saturn will begin to go in a retrograde or westward direction in front of the constellation Virgo. That is a signal that the best time to see Saturn in 2011 has begun. Give me 5 minutes, and I’ll give you Saturn in 2011 The planet Saturn – a golden world that appears to shine steadily on the sky’s dome – is rising in the east around 11 p.m. now. ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 25, Last quarter moon, Saturn,

Sky Tonight—January 25, Last quarter moon, Saturn, Spica before sunrise

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The last quarter moon and the planet Saturn will shine on opposite sides of the bright star Spica before sunrise tomorrow (January 26). As seen from the northern hemisphere, the trio will appear southward before dawn. If you are more of a night owl than an early bird, and live at mid-northern latitudes, you can catch all three – the moon, Spica, and Saturn – in your southeastern sky around 1 a.m. to 2 ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—January 24, Moon, Saturn, Spica from

Sky Tonight—January 24, Moon, Saturn, Spica from midnight until dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org If you are willing to stay up late or to get up early, you can use the waning gibbous moon to find the planet Saturn and the constellation Virgo’s brightest star Spica. As seen from mid-northern latitudes, comparable to those in the United States, you might see all three luminaries – the moon, Saturn, Spica – low in your eastern sky by around midnight tonight. Farther north, the shining threesome ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—December 27, Moon, bright star, two

Sky Tonight—December 27, Moon, bright star, two planets before dawn

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Before dawn tomorrow (Tuesday, December 28), look in the east for the planet Saturn and star Spica near the last quarter moon. Beneath this threesome – moon, Saturn and Spica – you will see the blazing planet Venus much closer to the eastern predawn horizon. You might be seeing these objects when there is a fair amount of predawn twilight washing the sky. The planets and stars have colors of their ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 24,Venus getting brighter in

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 24,Venus getting brighter in the predawn sky

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The planet Venus – the most brilliant celestial object after the sun and moon – is getting brighter day by day in the November predawn sky. This dazzling world was in our evening sky earlier this year. However, it recently passed between earth and the sun, so that it now rises about 3 hours before sunrise as seen from mid-northern latitudes. Moreover, at middle latitudes south of the equator, Venus ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—September 5, Hazy pyramid of light

EarthSky Tonight—September 5, Hazy pyramid of light in east? False dawn.

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Late summer and early autumn present the best time of year to see the false dawn, also known as the zodiacal light. With the moon out of the morning sky for the next two weeks, this is your chance to catch the zodiacal light before dawn. This light can be noticeable and easy to see from latitudes like those in the southern U.S. I’ve seen it many times from the latitude of southern Texas, sometimes while driving a lonely ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica,

EarthSky Tonight—August 14, Look for moon, Spica, Venus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the west after sunset tonight, you will find Spica and the waxing crescent moon. The planets to the right of the moon are Mars, Venus and Saturn. Of those planets, Venus will be easiest to see because it is so bright. You might need binoculars for Mars and Saturn. Spica is known as a blue-white star. Can you detect its color in contrast to nearby stars? If not, try looking at Spica with binoculars. Spica isn’t ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 7, Venus, Mars, Saturn form

Earthsky Tonight—August 7, Venus, Mars, Saturn form planetary trio in west

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Around August 7 and 8, look in the west after sunset for the planets Venus, Mars and Saturn as they form what is known as a planetary trio. Around August 7 and 8, look in the west after sunset for the planets Venus, Mars and Saturn as they form what is known as a planetary trio. A planetary trio is a grouping of three planets that fits inside a circle that is only 5 degrees wide. Typically, a binocular field spans about 5 ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—August 1, Mercury, Venus, Mars,

Earthsky Tonight—August 1, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn after sunset

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org The western sky after evening twilight has hosted a trio of planets for the past several weeks. However, there is room for one more! Mercury, the closest planet to the sun, has been moving away from the solar glare to accompany Venus, Mars, and Saturn. Horizon-hugging Mercury does not stay visible long, however. Brilliant Venus is the easiest to spot at daylight wanes. Look for Mercury soon after sunset as the brightest ... Full Story

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