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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Thursday, October 23, 2014

FEMA: Summary of announcements

Fema 11 FEMA: Summary of announcements

 

Steps to Applying for FEMA Assistance

DENVER – Colorado residents in designated counties recovering from the damage caused by recent severe storms, flooding, landslides, or mudslides can now register for disaster assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Colorado Office of Emergency Management.

The major federal disaster declaration, signed by President Obama Sept. 14, offers Individual Assistance in the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan and Weld. Residents from these counties can now register with FEMA.

Assistance for losses sustained any time after the storm, which began on Sept. 11, may include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses and other programs to help recover from the effects of the disaster.

Even those with insurance may be eligible for help from FEMA if their insurance policy does not cover all their needs.

Step 1: Register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

There are several ways to register:

• Apply online anytime at www.DisasterAssistance.gov.

• Call 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY at 800-462-7585. Those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS) may call 800-621-3362. The toll-free telephone numbers operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week until further notice. Multilingual operators are available to assist with the application process.

• By smartphone or tablet, use m.fema.gov.

 

When applying for aid, you will receive a nine-digit registration number that can be used for reference when corresponding with FEMA.

It is helpful to have the following information handy:

• Current telephone number;

• Address at the time of the disaster and current address;

• Social Security number, if available;

• A general list of damages and losses;

• If insured, the name of insurance company, agent and policy number; and Bank routing number for any direct deposit.

Step 2: Receive a property inspection.

Within a few days after registering, eligible applicants will be telephoned to make an appointment to have their damaged property inspected. The inspectors, who are FEMA contractors and carry identification badges, visit to make a record of damage. They do not make a determination regarding assistance. There is no cost for the inspection.

Step 3: All applicants will receive a letter from FEMA regarding the status of their requests for federal assistance.

Some will also receive an application for a low-interest disaster recovery loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

Anyone who has questions about the letter from FEMA should call the helpline (800-621-3362 or TTY, 800-462-7585).

Those who receive an application packet from the SBA should complete and submit the forms. No one is required to accept a loan but submitting the application may open the door to additional FEMA grants.

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Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards

Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management supports the needs of local government and partners with them before, during and after a disaster and to enhance preparedness statewide by devoting available resources toward prevention, protection, mitigation, response and recovery, which will ensure greater resiliency of our communities.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is the federal government’s primary source of money for the long-term rebuilding of disaster-damaged private property.  SBA helps homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes, and private, nonprofit organizations fund repairs or rebuilding efforts, and cover the cost of replacing lost or disaster-damaged personal property.  These disaster loans cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other recoveries and do not duplicate benefits of other agencies or organizations. For information about SBA programs, applicants can go to www.sba.gov/disaster or call (800) 659-2955: (TTY 1-800-977-8339).

 

 

DISASTER HELP AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATELY OWNED ROADS

Homeowners using privately owned access roads and bridges that were damaged as a result of the severe storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides may receive limited disaster assistance help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

FEMA’s Individual Assistance (IA) program is available to help homeowners, renters and business owners in nine designated Colorado counties (Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan and Weld).

• Homeowners may be eligible for a grant to repair road entrances or rights of way from their homes, including privately owned roads and bridges that provide solitary access to a home.

• Homeowners who jointly own access roads and bridges may also be eligible for repair grants under certain circumstances.

• To discuss your circumstance, please visit any of seven disaster recovery centers or call FEMA at 800-621-3362 (Voice or 7-1-1/Relay) or TTY 800-462-7585.

The SBA offers low-interest disaster loans for homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes and private nonprofit organizations.

In some cases, SBA may be able to offer low-interest rate disaster loans to help homeowners, homeowner associations, co-ops or road-owner associations that own damaged privately owned roads or bridges that provide solitary access to a home.  SBA disaster loans must only be used to pay for disaster-related repairs. They cannot be used to pay for pre-existing damage or any upgrades to the property, unless such upgrades are code required.

• Please visit a disaster recovery center or an SBA Business Recovery Center to discuss your case.

For more SBA information go to www.sba.gov/disaster or call (800) 659-2955

(TTY 1-800-977-8339).

 

If individuals have concerns about their disaster-damaged privately owned access road, they should contact their local emergency manager.

 

BE CAUTIOUS WHEN RETURNING TO A FLOOD-DAMAGED HOME

 

DENVER – Homeowners returning to flood-damaged homes should use caution – structural damage may have made the house unsafe, electricity and gas may pose a threat, and animals may have taken up residence in the house. A careful and systematic approach is recommended when returning to any area after a severe storm or flood.

Going Home

Inspect the outside of the house before entering. Look for cracks in the foundation and make sure that porch roofs and overhangs are adequately supported. If you have any doubts about safety, do not enter and have your residence inspected by a qualified building inspector or structural engineer.

• Turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker from a dry location. Never turn power on or off or use an electric tool or appliance while standing in water.

• Turn off the gas.

• Call the utility company if you find downed power lines or suspect a gas leak.

• Do not use generators or other gasoline-powered machines indoors. They emit carbon monoxide that can be deadly. All cooking on camp stoves and charcoal grills should only be done outside.

Entering Your Home

If it appears safe to enter, do so carefully. Heed the following precautions:

• A stuck door may mean that the ceiling is ready to cave in. If it only sticks at the bottom, it can be forced open. If it sticks at the top, your ceiling may be ready to fall.

• Check ceilings for signs of sagging. Rain or deep flooding may soak plaster and drywall. Expect floors to be slippery. Remove any debris that may have floated into your home.

• Be on the lookout for snakes, wild or stray animals. Remember that insects may have moved in while the house was empty.

Cleaning Up Your Home

Groundwater creates enormous pressure on basement walls and floors. Drain the basement no more than one foot per day to minimize further damage.

Floodwaters damage materials, leave mud, silt and unknown contaminants and promote the growth of mold and mildew. Dry your home to reduce these hazards and the damage they cause. Let fresh air move through your home. Open windows and doors if weather permits.

• Walls, floors, closets, shelves, contents and other parts of your home that have been flooded should be thoroughly washed and disinfected. Disinfect items that may have been contaminated by raw sewage, bacteria, or chemicals.

• Have appliances checked by a professional before using them again. Check with your local power company before turning the electricity on.

• Pump out wells and have the water tested by experts before drinking. Do not flush toilets until you know that sewage lines are intact.

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FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Follow FEMA online at www.fema.gov/blog, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.The social media links are provided for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

 

WHAT TO EXPECT – INSPECTIONS

DENVER – After Colorado survivors apply for federal help that includes aid for damage to their homes, housing inspections are the next step.

A Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) inspector will contact you to schedule an appointment for an inspection. The inspection is needed to verify and assess damages listed in your application. The inspection generally takes 30-40 minutes or less and consists of a general inspection of damaged areas of the home and a review of your records. There is no fee for the inspection.

When a FEMA housing inspector comes to visit your home, be sure they show you proper identification. All FEMA inspectors have prominent photo ID badges. If you are not shown photo identification, then do not allow the inspection. Unfortunately, disasters often bring out criminals who prey on the needs of disaster survivors – so beware of scams and scam artists.

If you suspect someone is posing as a FEMA inspector, call our toll-free Disaster Fraud Hotline at 866-720-5721, or call your local law enforcement officials.

It’s important to note that throughout the recovery process, applicants may receive a visit from more than one inspector. In addition to FEMA housing inspectors, representatives from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) as well as state and local officials could visit neighborhoods in affected areas along with inspectors for private insurance coverage.

When a FEMA Housing Inspector visits your home, someone 18 years of age or older who lived in the household prior to the disaster must be present for the scheduled appointment. The inspector will ask to see:

• Photo identification.

• Proof of ownership/occupancy of damaged residence (structural insurance, tax bill, mortgage payment book/utility bill).

• Insurance documents: home and/or auto (structural insurance/auto declaration sheet).

• List of household occupants living in residence at time of disaster.

• All disaster related damages to both real and personal property.

Once the inspection process is complete, your case will be reviewed by FEMA and you will receive a letter, or email if you signed up for E-Correspondence, outlining the decision about your claim.

 

FEMA DISASTER SURVIVOR ASSISTANCE TEAMS HELP FLOOD SURVIVORS

DENVER – Twenty-three Disaster Survivor Assistance Teams (DSATs) are helping flood survivors connect with recovery services in Adams, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer and Weld counties.

The DSATs are made up of disaster specialists from FEMA and are canvassing areas to give residents an opportunity to register for disaster assistance and to quickly address immediate and emerging needs. DSATs can also provide referrals to additional resources when unmet needs remain.

Using tablets, the FEMA teams will collect each survivor’s information and submit a request for federal assistance. These mobile team members can be identified easily by their photo identifications and FEMA clothing. Colorado residents are reminded to ask for federal identification before providing personal information.

Homeowners, renters and business owners in designated counties who sustained damage as a result of the severe storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides that began on Sept. 11, may now apply for state and federal disaster assistance.

Federal disaster assistance for qualified applicants may include:

• Grants to rent a new place to live temporarily as needed.

• Grants for home repairs not covered by insurance.

• Grants for serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance—such as medical, dental and funeral expenses, moving and storage fees, and personal property replacement.

Survivors in the counties currently designated for Individual Assistance (Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan and Weld) who sustained losses or damage from the storms may register with FEMA by visiting DisasterAssistance.gov, using their mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling:  800-621-FEMA (3362). People who have a speech disability or are deaf or hard of hearing may call (TTY) 800-462-7585; users of 711 or Video Relay Service can call 800-621-3362. Help is available in many languages.

Register online:  www.DisasterAssistance.gov.

Register by Web-enabled device, tablet or smartphone: type m.fema.gov in the browser.

For more information on the disaster operations, go to fema.gov/disaster/4145

To find the DRC closest to you, go to fema.gov/disaster-recovery-centers.

The toll-free numbers remain open from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. (MDT) seven days a week.

RENTERS MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR FEMA GRANTS

DENVER – FEMA Individual Assistance is not only for homeowners. It is also be available for eligible renters, and it could include a grant to help pay for temporary emergency housing.

Renters in nine Colorado counties – Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan and Weld – could be eligible for FEMA disaster assistance if their homes were damaged by the recent storms, flooding, landslides or mudslides.

Other FEMA grants can include help paying for disaster-related expenses that include:

• Replacement or repair of necessary personal property such as furniture and appliances;

• Replacement or repair of tools and other job-related equipment required by the self-employed;

• Primary vehicles and approved secondary vehicles;

• Medical and dental bills, and

• Funeral and burial bills.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) also offers low-interest loans to renters for personal property losses.

The first step is to register with FEMA. People with disaster-related damages can register by phone at 800-621-FEMA (3362). Call center hours are 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., MDT, seven days a week. Applicants who are deaf or hard-of-hearing can use TTY 800-462-7585. People can also register on line at disasterassistance.gov.

For more information on the disaster operations, go to fema.gov/disaster/4145

To find the DRC closest to you, go to fema.gov/disaster-recovery-centers.

• For more information go to www.sba.gov/disaster or call (800) 659-2955

(TTY 1-800-977-8339).

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Follow FEMA online at www.fema.gov/blog, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.The social media links are provided for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management supports the needs of local government and partners with them before, during and after a disaster and to enhance preparedness statewide by devoting available resources toward prevention, protection, mitigation, response and recovery, which will ensure greater resiliency of our communities. For more information: www.coemergency.com

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is the federal government’s primary source of money for the long-term rebuilding of disaster-damaged private property.  SBA helps homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes, and private, nonprofit organizations fund repairs or rebuilding efforts, and cover the cost of replacing lost or disaster-damaged personal property.  These disaster loans cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other recoveries and do not duplicate benefits of other agencies or organizations. For information about SBA programs, applicants can go to www.sba.gov/disaster or call (800) 659-2955

(TTY 1-800-977-8339).

 

FEMA SPECIALISTS OFFER REBUILDING ADVICE

Boulder and Weld Counties to Host Mitigation Advising Teams Starting Saturday

DENVER – Mitigation specialists from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be in Greeley, Longmont and Louisville to provide free rebuilding information Saturday, Sept. 28, through Tuesday, Oct. 1.

Advisers have suggestions and publications to help homeowners, renters and business owners protect their properties against damaging winds, floods and fires, and reduce damages from future events. Mitigation measures may also reduce mold and mildew and protect electrical systems, furnaces and other appliances.

FEMA mitigation advisers will be available the same hours at all three locations: Saturday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Lowe’s Home Improvement

2400 – 47 Ave.

Greeley, CO 80634

Lowe’s Home Improvement

355 Ken Pratt Blvd.

Longmont, CO 80501

Lowe’s Home Improvement

1171 Dillon Ave.

Louisville, CO 80027

The mitigation teams will also have free reference booklets in English and Spanish, including:

•   Preparing Makes Sense, Get Ready Now

•   Protecting Your Home From Flood Damage

•   Help After a Disaster

•   Mold & Mildew: Cleaning Up Your Flood-Damaged Home.

Information about strengthening property can be downloaded at www.fema.gov/rebuild 
  

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