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News for Norther Colorado and the world

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Leo’

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Sharp telescopic views of magnificent edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3628 show a puffy galactic disk divided by dark dust lanes. The tantalizing scene puts many astronomers in mind of its popular moniker, The Hamburger Galaxy.Edge-on NGC 3628  Image Credit & Copyright: Stephen Leshin Explanation: Sharp telescopic views of magnificent edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3628 show a puffy galactic disk divided by dark dust lanes. The tantalizing scene puts many astronomers in mind of its popular ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 27, Leo loses his tail. We gain a

Sky Tonight—April 27, Leo loses his tail. We gain a constellation.

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Tonight’s chart again shows the evening sky high to the south. To the upper left of the constellation Leo the Lion are dozens of very faint stars. They make up the constellation Coma Berenices, otherwise known as Berenice’s Hair. The Greek-Egyptian astronomer Ptolemy and others considered it the tuft at the end of Leo the Lion’s tail. Coma Berenices remained part of Leo until a few hundred years ... Full Story

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma

Sky Tonight—April 26, Star-hop from Leo to the Coma star cluster

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Our diagram shows the constellation Leo the Lion for about 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. tonight. At this time, the Lion will be due south and at his highest point in the sky. Two distinctive star patterns make the Lion easy to identify. Leo’s brightest star – the sparkling blue-white gem Regulus – dots a backward question mark of stars known as The Sickle. If you see a Lion in this pattern of stars, the Sickle ... Full Story

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

NGC 3521 Close Up Credit: Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA Processing - Robert Gendler Explanation: Gorgeous spiral galaxy NGC 3521 is a mere 35 million light-years distant, toward the constellation Leo. Spanning some 50,000 light-years, its central region is shown in this dramatic image, constructed from data drawn from the Hubble Legacy Archive. The close-up view highlights this galaxy's characteristic multiple, patchy, irregular spiral arms laced with dust and ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 17, No meteors last night? Try

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 17, No meteors last night? Try between moonset and dawn November 18

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org The forecast calls for the annual Leonid meteor shower to be at its best during the predawn hours on Wednesday, November 17, or Thursday, November 18. Which morning will be best for the U.S.? You’ll have to go out under a clear dark country sky to see for yourself. If the prediction holds true, Asia should be in the best position to see the Leonids at their peak on Thursday – in between moonset and ... Full Story

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 16, Leonid meteors peak before

EarthSky Tonight—Nov 16, Leonid meteors peak before dawn November 17 and 18

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science Visit EarthSky at www.EarthSky.org Here is the radiant point for the Leonid meteor shower. The 2010 Leonid meteor shower is expected to peak before dawn on Wednesday, November 17, or Thursday, November 18. If you have a dark sky – far from city lights – you might see as many as 10 to 15 meteors per hour at the shower’s peak. The best time to watch will be after the moon sets in the wee hours before dawn. Many ask about the radiant ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight—May 20, First quarter moon – or

Earthsky Tonight—May 20, First quarter moon – or ‘half moon’ – near Regulus and Mars

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org In the west-southwest this evening, the first-quarter moon hangs below the “Sickle” of the constellation Leo the Lion, and its brightest star, Regulus. Note that the “Sickle” looks like a backward question mark. If you hold your outstretched fist to the right of the moon, it will span the distance to a ruddy “star” – but that’s no star, it’s the planet Mars. Ever since the end of January – when Mars and ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 23, Waxing gibbous moon

Earthsky Tonight — April 23, Waxing gibbous moon near Regulus

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Tonight, the waxing gibbous moon shines fairly close to the silvery-blue star Regulus in the constellation Leo. To the east of the moon shines the golden planet Saturn. If you cannot distinguish color with the unaided eye, try binoculars. By tomorrow night, a somewhat fuller waxing gibbous moon will have moved away from Regulus and closer to Saturn. Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion, and it ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight — April 9: Star-hop to Canes

Earthsky Tonight — April 9: Star-hop to Canes Venatici, the Hunting Dogs

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org We show a larger section of sky than we normally do on this chart. We’re looking directly overhead at about 10:00 p.m., viewing the sky from the comfort of a reclining lawn chair, with our feet pointing southward. The constellation Leo the Lion stands high in the southern sky, while the upside-down Big Dipper is high in the north. Tonight, we star-hop to the constellation Canes Venatici the Hunting Dogs by using the Big ... Full Story

Earthsky Tonight – January 30, 2010 Moon in Leo,

Earthsky Tonight – January 30, 2010 Moon in Leo, Mars in Cancer

Courtesy of EarthSky A Clear Voice for Science www.EarthSky.org Our chart shows the eastern sky for around 8 to 9 o’clock tonight. The planet Mars shines brightly above the full-looking waning gibbous moon. Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion, lurks to the lower left of the moon. Although Regulus rates as a first-magnitude star, it may be hard to spot in the lunar glare tonight. Try binoculars, if you can’t see Regulus with the eye alone. The ... Full Story

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